Gut health – Gut Training http://gut-training.com/ Wed, 18 May 2022 17:09:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gut-training.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png Gut health – Gut Training http://gut-training.com/ 32 32 how the gut affects overall health: how gut health affects overall health https://gut-training.com/how-the-gut-affects-overall-health-how-gut-health-affects-overall-health/ Tue, 17 May 2022 16:05:00 +0000 https://gut-training.com/how-the-gut-affects-overall-health-how-gut-health-affects-overall-health/ You may have heard of the gut-brain connection. But, recently, various studies have also revealed that your gut health can impact the whole body. The gut microbiome involves bacteria, microorganisms, fungi, and viruses found in the gastrointestinal tract. It plays an important role in the absorption of key nutrients and minerals helping you to have […]]]>
You may have heard of the gut-brain connection. But, recently, various studies have also revealed that your gut health can impact the whole body. The gut microbiome involves bacteria, microorganisms, fungi, and viruses found in the gastrointestinal tract. It plays an important role in the absorption of key nutrients and minerals helping you to have a healthy gut.

How does the gut microbiota affect the body?

Gastroenterologist Dr. Roy Patankar says, “Your gut health depends on what you eat. It has been proven by various studies that in addition to having an impact on digestion, intestinal health is also related to the body. It is believed that an imbalance of gut microbes causes dysbiosis which has been linked to conditions such as obesity, due to the lack of a healthy microbiome and poor gut health.

“You will be shocked to learn that dysbiosis can lead to life-threatening health issues such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and colon cancer,” says Dr. Patankar.

Additionally, noted changes in the gut microbiome are also associated with diabetes, liver disease, and even neurodegenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis, according to research.

Numerous studies have also revealed a connection between the gut and the heart. The gut microbiota can produce a chemical called trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), which causes the artery to become blocked. High levels of TMAO increase the risks of heart disease and increase mortality and morbidity rates in patients.

One can also have a leaky gut in which unwanted microbes are present in the body. This invites inflammation throughout the body and weakens the immune system.

According to a few studies, imbalances in the gut microbiome are also linked to mental health issues. Your gut is connected to nerves and is involved in messaging with the brain. Many neurotransmitters, like serotonin, are made in the gut and lead to feelings of happiness and well-being. Those who are depressed, stressed or anxious will have low serotonin levels. Good nutrition can help overcome anxiety, stress and depression.

Tips for taking care of your gut

Fermented foods contribute to a healthy microbiome. So, have yogurt, sauerkraut, kimchi and kefir. Try to have a high fiber diet. Include fresh fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes and legumes in the diet. Avoid fatty, junk, spicy, canned and processed foods that can irritate the gut and lower your immunity. Say NO to irritants such as coffee, alcohol, smoking, colas and sodas. Opt for teas like ginger, chamomile, and peppermint. Drink enough water to flush out all toxins from the body. Exercising daily and staying stress-free can also help keep the gut healthy.

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Bacteria with recording function capture intestinal health status https://gut-training.com/bacteria-with-recording-function-capture-intestinal-health-status/ Thu, 12 May 2022 20:36:28 +0000 https://gut-training.com/bacteria-with-recording-function-capture-intestinal-health-status/ Our gut is home to countless bacteria that help us digest food. But what exactly do microorganisms do inside the body? What enzymes do they produce and when? And how do bacteria metabolize healthy foods that help us ward off disease? To get answers to these questions, researchers from the Department of Biosystems Science and […]]]>

Our gut is home to countless bacteria that help us digest food. But what exactly do microorganisms do inside the body? What enzymes do they produce and when? And how do bacteria metabolize healthy foods that help us ward off disease?

To get answers to these questions, researchers from the Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering at ETH Zurich in Basel have modified bacteria to function as data loggers to obtain information about the gene activity. Together with scientists from the University Hospital of Bern and the University of Bern, they have now tested these bacteria on mice. This is an important step towards the future use of sensory bacteria in medicine for applications such as diagnosing malnutrition and understanding diets suitable for an individual.

The immune system becomes a data logger

The data logging feature was developed over the past few years by researchers led by Randall Platt, professor of biological engineering at ETH Zurich. To do this, they used the CRISPR-Cas mechanism, which is a type of immune system found naturally in many bacterial species. If bacteria are attacked by viruses, they can incorporate fragments of viral DNA or RNA into a section of their own genome called the CRISPR matrix. This allows the bacteria to “remember” the viruses they have come into contact with, allowing them to fight off a future viral attack more quickly.

To use this mechanism as a data logger, the researchers did not concern themselves with extracts of DNA from viral intruders, but focused on something else: the mechanism can be exploited in such a way that bacteria incorporate extracts of their own Messenger RNA (mRNA). in the CRISPR network. mRNA molecules are the blueprint that cells use to make proteins. As such, mRNA extracts can reveal which genes are used to build proteins to perform cellular functions.

To make the method effective, the scientists introduced the CRISPR network of the bacterial species Fusicatenibacter saccharivorans in a strain of gut bacteria Escherichia coli, which is considered safe for humans and available as a probiotic. The transfer included the blueprint for an enzyme called reverse transcriptase, which can transcribe RNA into DNA. This enzyme also transcribes the information contained in mRNA into DNA, which, along with CRISPR-associated proteins, is necessary to incorporate the DNA extract into the CRISPR network.

Get information without disturbing the body

Then, researchers from Bern University Hospital and the University of Bern, led by Andrew Macpherson, administered these modified gut bacteria to mice in the laboratory. They collected fecal samples from the animals and isolated bacterial DNA, which they then analyzed using high-throughput DNA sequencing. Through subsequent bioinformatics assessment, performed and evaluated collaboratively, they were able to work through the mass of data and reconstruct the genetic information from the mRNA extracts. This allowed scientists to determine by non-invasive means how often gut bacteria made a given mRNA molecule while in the body, and therefore which genes are active.

“This new method allows us to obtain information directly from the intestine, without having to disturb the intestinal functions”, explains Andrew Macpherson, professor and director of gastroenterology at the University Hospital of Bern. As such, the method has major advantages over endoscopies, which can be unpleasant for patients and always involve disruption of bowel function, as the bowels must be empty for the examination.

Determination of food status

“Bacteria are very good at registering environmental conditions and adapting their metabolism to new circumstances such as dietary changes,” says Macpherson. In experiments with mice given different foods, the researchers were able to show how the bacteria adapt their metabolism to the respective nutrient supply. A report of the findings was published in the latest issue of the journal Science.

The researchers would like to develop the method further, so that one day they can study human patients to see how diet influences the gut ecosystem and how this affects health. In the future, they hope to use the method to determine the dietary status of children or adults. Armed with this information, doctors will be able to diagnose malnutrition or decide if a patient needs nutritional supplements.

Additionally, the researchers were able to recognize inflammatory responses in the gut. The researchers administered the sensor bacteria to mice with intestinal inflammation as well as to healthy mice. This way, they could identify the specific mRNA profile of gut bacteria that go into inflammation mode.

Distinguish different bacteria

Current research published in the journal Science includes a scientific development that allows researchers to distinguish two strains of bacteria from each other based on individual genetic “barcodes”. In the future, this will make it possible to study the function of genetic mutations in bacteria in laboratory animals. This will allow scientists to compare the mRNA profile of different bacteria, such as normal versus mutant bacteria. Thanks to the molecular data logger, it is possible for the first time to determine this profile, because they pass through the intestine and not only when the bacteria reach the feces, so the information shows what happened when the bacteria still lived in the gut.

Another possible avenue would be to further develop the system to distinguish the RNA profiles of bacteria in the small intestine and the large intestine. In addition, the data logger function could be integrated with other types of bacteria. This would open the door to applications in the field of environmental monitoring. An analysis of the bacteria in the soil of a cultivated field, for example, would make it possible to establish whether herbicides have been used.

Safe application possible

The researchers have filed patent applications for the method itself and for characteristic RNA profiles that are signatures of certain nutritional molecules and indicators of gut health.

Before the sensor bacteria can be used outside the lab – including in human patients – scientists still need to clarify various safety and legal issues, as the bacteria have been genetically modified. “In principle, there are ways to use living genetically modified microorganisms as diagnostic or therapeutic agents in medicine, provided certain conditions are met,” says Platt. It is possible, for example, to modify the bacteria in the sensor so that they need certain nutrients and can therefore only survive in the intestine of a patient. As soon as these particular bacteria leave the intestine, they will die. The integration of appropriate security mechanisms is the next step towards the application of the method in medicine.

This research was supported by ERC grants awarded to Randall Platt and Andrew Macpherson, and by a grant from the Botnar Research Center for Child Health. The studies involving mice were carried out at the Clean Mouse Facility at the University of Bern, which is supported by the Genaxen research foundation.

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The gut health benefits of drinking chia milk https://gut-training.com/the-gut-health-benefits-of-drinking-chia-milk/ Wed, 11 May 2022 18:30:00 +0000 https://gut-training.com/the-gut-health-benefits-of-drinking-chia-milk/ The culprit for your frequent stomach aches, gas, and bloating is most likely poor gut health. It has been widely reported that processed and sugary foods can cause intestinal inflammation, leading to these bothersome symptoms. But even dairy products can be difficult to digest if the lactase enzyme in your small intestine isn’t able to […]]]>

The culprit for your frequent stomach aches, gas, and bloating is most likely poor gut health. It has been widely reported that processed and sugary foods can cause intestinal inflammation, leading to these bothersome symptoms. But even dairy products can be difficult to digest if the lactase enzyme in your small intestine isn’t able to fully break down lactose (the sugar in milk).

Fortunately, small dietary adjustments can make a huge difference in restoring your gut function and maintaining good health for years to come. To start, consider replacing a fridge staple like whole milk with chia milk instead.

We spoke with a dietitian Wendy BazilianDrPH, RDN, to learn more about this dairy-free alternative and why it’s a gut-friendly beverage option!

What is chia milk?

As its name suggests, chia seeds are a key ingredient in this vegetable milk. Specifically, a brand like Seeds of Wellness (Buy a 6-pack on Amazon, $24.99) contains chia seed protein and chia oil. These two nutrients infuse the milk with the sweet nutty flavor of the seeds and their health benefits while keeping it smooth and creamy.

Chia seeds have amazing health benefits as they are rich in antioxidants, calcium and iron. Another benefit of regularly consuming these seeds (especially in the form of “milk”) is that they keep your gut health in top shape.

What are the gut health benefits of drinking chia milk?

Dr. Bazilian tells First for women the three qualities of this dairy-free milk that make it so good for gut health.

  • This milk will not upset your digestive tract. “Chia milk is easy to digest and has no known allergenicity in humans (chia seed has not been shown to be an allergen; [it has an] extremely low risk if any) compared to other plant-based nut or soy milks or dairy products (three of nine allergens that must be listed on food labels). Chia milk has none of that,” she explains.
  • It is an excellent source of omega-3s. “Uniquely, chia milk also provides plant-based omega-3 fatty acids that have been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties,” she notes. “Very often people who have increased inflammation or chronic inflammation have digestive issues or symptoms.”
  • Unsweetened chia milk contains about 20 calories and 2 grams of fiber per one-cup serving. “Chia milk also provides fiber – unique in a plant-based milk – and the fiber is generally not ‘added fiber’ like inositol and as some people are sensitive to, but comes from the chia itself,” says -she. “[Also]chia milk provides a low-calorie, tasty way to boost hydration, which is essential for overall healthy digestion.

As you can see, this plant-based milk is a clear winner for a tasty and healthy dairy exchange in your daily meals!

How can you add this milk to your daily diet?

Chia milk is a more versatile ingredient than you might think. In fact, Bazilian notes that you can use it in many of your favorite breakfast, lunch, and dinner dishes. Here are some delicious ways to add it to your diet:

  • Use it to make smoothies
  • Put it in soups with leeks, potatoes, corn or other complementary flavors
  • Cook oatmeal or cereal in this milk when making oatmeal or porridge in the morning
  • Make “beautiful” custards (vegan alternatives to ice cream) and other frozen desserts like creamy “milks”
  • Include in baked goods and recipes like French toast
  • Make chia puddings
  • Put in toppings and sauces
  • Use in mashed cauliflower or in healthier macaroni and cheese recipes
  • Substitute it in mashed potatoes and other savory dishes that usually call for real milk
  • Pour it as a cream in hot or iced coffee

Want to know more about other gut-friendly foods to avoid digestive upset? Check out this handy guide to 10 foods that fight constipation and improve gut health!

We write about products that we think our readers will love. If you buy them, we get a small share of the vendor’s revenue.

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Gut Health: Your 5 Minute Read https://gut-training.com/gut-health-your-5-minute-read/ Tue, 10 May 2022 18:21:21 +0000 https://gut-training.com/gut-health-your-5-minute-read/ Your gut is always trying to tell you something. Whether it’s grunts, growls, or silences, your gut is highly sensitive to everything from your meal choices to your mood. In fact, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract — aka the digestive system — is one of the body’s most important barometers of health. Approximately 70 percent cells […]]]>

Your gut is always trying to tell you something. Whether it’s grunts, growls, or silences, your gut is highly sensitive to everything from your meal choices to your mood.

In fact, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract — aka the digestive system — is one of the body’s most important barometers of health. Approximately 70 percent cells of our immune system live in the gastrointestinal tract.

With a little TLC, we can all have happy bellies. Eating certain foods and avoiding stress triggers is a great start to keeping your gut functioning and comfortable.

And in case of problem? Here are some tips to get your digestive tract back on track.

Your gut naturally contains a host of invisible organisms. This little world is what scientists call the gut microbiome. These organisms are mainly fungi, viruses, parasites and some bacteria.

Some of these microbes are associated with certain diseases and conditions, but others are important for your health and digestion. According to National Institutes of Health (NIH)your gut works best when it’s populated with a wide variety of microbes.

You can help your gut microbiome stay balanced by eating foods that support the growth of “good” bacteria and fungi. Many fiber-rich foods, known as prebiotics, create an intestinal environment that helps these beneficial insects thrive.

Here are some examples of prebiotic foods. These are recommended by Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health:

  • asparagus
  • bananas
  • Beans
  • Garlic
  • leeks
  • onions
  • whole grains (like barley, oats, and wheat)

Believe it or not, many “funky” foods — including that tangy deli pickle in your midday sub — can boost gut health.

When food ferments, helpful microbes grow on it, fed by the sugar molecules in the food. A lot experts think these microbes, called probiotics, can help contribute to a healthy gut environment.

Consider adding the following delicious fermented foods to your diet:

  • kefir
  • Kimchi
  • kombucha
  • pickles
  • Sauerkraut
  • yogurt

Staying active and paying attention to your mental health can also improve your belly.

Evidence suggests that exercise can help balance your gut. Results show that regular aerobic exercise — like brisk walking or cycling a few times a week — can help the good bacteria in our guts thrive.

A calm mood can also help keep your stomach healthy. Neurons in the brain are connected to neurons in the gut – one reason you might feel “butterflies” in your stomach when you’re anxious.

According to American Psychological Association (APA)stress can also upset digestion and is associated with problems ranging from temporary flatulence to chronic bowel problems.

Dysbiosis is a fancy term for when your gut microbial balance is out of whack.

experts say it can happen when you catch a bacterial or parasitic illness, take a long course of antibiotics, or are under severe stress.

Symptoms of dysbiosis include:

  • abdominal pain
  • bloating
  • diarrhea
  • gas

You may develop one or more of these symptoms persistently. These symptoms may be associated with certain digestive conditions like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis.

If you have chronic digestive symptoms, it is important to see your healthcare professional to rule out an underlying medical condition.

We all go through periods when we have avoided good nutrition and self-care, and our bellies may protest in response.

Research from 2017 shows that it is possible to restore the balance of gut bacteria and improve some digestive symptoms through diet and lifestyle changes, including:

  • increase fiber intake from whole food sources
  • manage stress levels
  • sufficiently moisturizing
  • get enough sleep
  • stay active

For everyone – especially for people with irritable or inflammatory bowel problems – reduce sugar contribution is a good idea. Excess sugars such as fructose (in fruits and processed sweets) and lactose (from dairy products) can make stomach discomfort worse.

There’s a reason we “feel things in our gut.” Digestion problems can often be the first sign that you are sick or anxious.

But your gut is resilient. He can be quick to make noise when upset, but he will react easily to healthy changes. Adding more fiber-rich and fermented foods to your diet, reducing your sugar intake, exercising, and managing stress can all help keep your gut microbiome balanced and your belly at peace.

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The role of the microbiome in foal gut health in the spotlight https://gut-training.com/the-role-of-the-microbiome-in-foal-gut-health-in-the-spotlight/ Sat, 07 May 2022 21:05:25 +0000 https://gut-training.com/the-role-of-the-microbiome-in-foal-gut-health-in-the-spotlight/ The intestinal environment of foals and its development is being investigated by a Canadian researcher who is looking for a ‘red flag’ that could indicate why diarrhea can become fatal in some foals. Doctoral candidate Jennifer MacNicol, from the Department of Animal Biosciences at the Ontario Agricultural College, is working on a project slated to […]]]>

The intestinal environment of foals and its development is being investigated by a Canadian researcher who is looking for a ‘red flag’ that could indicate why diarrhea can become fatal in some foals.

Doctoral candidate Jennifer MacNicol, from the Department of Animal Biosciences at the Ontario Agricultural College, is working on a project slated to begin this summer studying mare and foal pairs to gain insight into how the the horse’s intestinal environment matures.

The foal’s intestine undergoes many changes as it develops rapidly. More and more, we are learning how colonization of a gut is correlated with good health. Exploring the differences between foal microbiomes and how these differences may relate to overall health has MacNicol excited about the potential advances that research could bring to the field of equine neonatal care.

Genomics research is rapidly expanding our knowledge of digestive health, but it is unclear why diarrhea can become fatal in some foals while others recover without additional symptoms.

MacNicol, who will work under Ontario Veterinary College researcher Dr. Luis Arroyo, will study microbial and metabolic data with the goal of learning which biomarkers denote health and which could signal a red flag when the intestine is colonized. She hopes to compare the health discrepancies that occur during critical episodes of diarrhea and use understanding of gut microbial developments in foals to move towards personalized treatments and therapeutics.

“What we want to look at is the development of the gastrointestinal microbiome with the metabolome. With the metabolome, we’re going to look at the by-products of microbial activity in the gut of foals and how that starts to mimic or develop to be similar to that of the mare,” MacNicol said.

“Then what we want to see in our subset (foals that develop diarrhea) is whether that microbiome or the metabolome differs significantly in the mare compared to our healthy set.”

The complex equine microbial environment begins to develop at birth and very quickly begins to reflect that of the mare and how quickly a foal adapts to be able to consume forage.

“There is often transient, self-limiting diarrhea in healthy foals,” MacNicol said.

“The problem is when it doesn’t self-limit and it becomes quite acute and quite drastic. Foals are at increased risk, as are human babies or any other newborns, because they are smaller and can get dehydrated a lot easier.Then you get the classic cycle where they get dehydrated, which makes them sicker, which means they get more dehydrated.

It is hoped that the early identification of problems through biomarkers will lead to new developments in the treatment of digestive problems in foals.

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Improving Gut Health for Weight Loss: The Amazing Health Benefits of Sacred Lotus You Need to Know About https://gut-training.com/improving-gut-health-for-weight-loss-the-amazing-health-benefits-of-sacred-lotus-you-need-to-know-about/ Sat, 07 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://gut-training.com/improving-gut-health-for-weight-loss-the-amazing-health-benefits-of-sacred-lotus-you-need-to-know-about/ Our network sites Residence > video gallery The lotus plant has multiple health benefits. From boosting immunity to making hair shiny and beautiful, let’s take a look at the major health benefits of […]]]>