Gut problems – Gut Training http://gut-training.com/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 04:37:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gut-training.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png Gut problems – Gut Training http://gut-training.com/ 32 32 7 Indian Dishes That Help Cure Bowel Problems https://gut-training.com/7-indian-dishes-that-help-cure-bowel-problems/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 05:01:00 +0000 https://gut-training.com/7-indian-dishes-that-help-cure-bowel-problems/ Doctors often recommend including gut-friendly foods in the diet because our gut health is linked to our overall health. These foods also contribute to the development of our immune system. So we contacted nutritionist Dr. Rohini Patil, Author of The lifestyle diet, and asked her to share some gut-friendly dietary recommendations. said Dr. Patil, Eating […]]]>

Doctors often recommend including gut-friendly foods in the diet because our gut health is linked to our overall health. These foods also contribute to the development of our immune system. So we contacted nutritionist Dr. Rohini Patil, Author of The lifestyle diet, and asked her to share some gut-friendly dietary recommendations. said Dr. Patil,

Eating junk food like pizza and burgers occasionally is okay, but shouldn’t become a habit. Bacteria living in the intestine play an important role in digestion, weight control and immunological function. What you eat not only supports you, but also supports the billions of bacteria that live in your gut.

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Read on to learn about 7 foods that support the gut.

1. Khichdi

This dish can help calm your stomach. The restorative fats and fibers in the ghee and dal balance the high glycemic load of rice. The meal is recommended in the satvik diet for a good and healthy gut, as well as other benefits like fiber intake. Khichdi relieves constipation, loose stools and vomiting. When you add vegetables to your khichdi, the nutritional content and health benefits increase significantly.

2. Besan Kadhi

Better known as Kadhi, it is high in magnesium and fiber, both of which are important for gut health. It is also used to treat menstrual cramps, constipation, and weight loss at home.

3. Curd rice

Curd rice is considered one of the most effective home treatments for digestive problems. The microbial properties of the curd make it a good treatment for indigestion. Curds are rich in beneficial bacteria that aid digestion and aid in weight loss. White rice is easy to digest and absorbs all the flavors of the curd without compromising its nutritional value. Curd rice helps maintain a healthy microbial balance in the body.

4. Idli

For centuries, this famous South Indian dish has been used to improve digestive health. Idlis are a healthy meal option as they are low in calories and high in gut bacteria. When eaten with chutney containing fermented foods, the benefits of probiotics are amplified. IdliThey are easy to eat for children and adults due to their texture and flavor.

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5. Murabba Amla

Amla promotes digestion and breaks down food into smaller particles, in addition to promoting improved absorption of nutrients from food. This murabbaIts high fiber content makes it ideal for digestive and gastrointestinal problems such as constipation and gastritis.

6. Dhokla

Your bowel movements will improve and your energy level will also increase by consuming dhokla, since it contributes to the balance of intestinal bacteria. DhoklaIts texture and flavor facilitate consumption by the elderly and toddlers.

7. Buttermilk

It is a by-product of the cream churning process. When cream or milk is made into butter, it leaves a non-greasy, thin, slightly acidic residue. This is how traditional handmade buttermilk (known in Indian homes as chhaas) is commonly characterized. Probiotics or live bacteria are found in buttermilk and are beneficial for our gut health and digestion. According to a growing body of evidence, irritable bowel syndrome can be treated with probiotic foods or drinks.

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5 Indian Foods That Can Cure Your Gut Problems https://gut-training.com/5-indian-foods-that-can-cure-your-gut-problems/ Sun, 23 Jan 2022 04:39:43 +0000 https://gut-training.com/5-indian-foods-that-can-cure-your-gut-problems/ A healthy gut is the key to living a happy life and having a healthy body. And so, here we have wellness advocate and nutrition coach Eshanka Wahi to spell out some side dish recipes that can treat your gut issues. She opines that fortunately; Indian cuisine offers a plethora of options that include all […]]]>

A healthy gut is the key to living a happy life and having a healthy body. And so, here we have wellness advocate and nutrition coach Eshanka Wahi to spell out some side dish recipes that can treat your gut issues. She opines that fortunately; Indian cuisine offers a plethora of options that include all the fiber and protein needed for a healthy gut. Our ancestors have been preparing these dishes for years and you can easily learn how to prepare them as well. You’ve been eating them since you were a kid, and now that you know they help you relax, you can eat them even more eagerly.

Here are 5 Indian foods to cure your intestinal problems are as follows-

1. Ayurvedic Khichdi- Ayurvedic khichdi is one of the healthiest meals eaten by our ancestors. It is ideal for infants and the elderly who have a low digestive fire. Ayurveda recommends eating a light meal at least once a day, preferably at dinner, and Ayurvedic khichdi fits perfectly on the menu. Ayurvedic khichdi is praised for cleansing the stomach, relieving constipation and improving overall health.

Ayurvedic khichdi ingredients boost immunity and energy in addition to calming and detoxifying the digestive system. Antioxidants are abundant in the main ingredients, which include

Cumin,

Turmeric,

· Fennel,

brown mustard seed,

ground coriander seed,

Asafoetida,

peppercorn,

· Cinnamon and cardamom.

Cumin and cardamom have high anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, as well as antibacterial and antiseptic properties. It can help with various digestive issues, including nausea, bloating, and constipation.

2.Konji- Konji is a homemade natural probiotic made from rice and water. This is an old South Indian recipe used by our ancestors to maintain a healthy gut. Konji recipe is a traditional comfort food from Kerala. It’s healthy, tasty and easy to make. It is a recommended food when you are sick or have an upset stomach.

To start making the konji recipe

Wash the rice and add it to a pressure cooker with 4 cups of water. Cook 6 to 7 whistles at high pressure then reduce to low pressure and cook for 15 minutes.

After 15 minutes, remove from heat. Let the pressure release naturally before opening the pressure cooker. If necessary, add more water to adjust the consistency of the konji rice.

To temper- Heat coconut oil in a tadka pan, then add mustard seeds and curry leaves and fry until fragrant. Now pour the tempering over the prepared konji. Serve garnished with chopped coriander leaves.

food for the intestines

3. Classic homemade nimbu pickle- Homemade lemon pickle is a natural preservative that can help with digestive issues. Lemon enzymes help in the production of bile. As a result, it helps in detoxification. Probiotics are healthy bacteria produced by the fermentation process in the pickle. This is known to aid digestion and improve gut health by making them more tolerant to pathogens and bad bacteria. Probiotics lower the pH level in the colon, allowing stool to move faster. Adding a spoonful of pickle to your meal not only improves the taste but also helps digestion.

gut foods

4. Homemade Amla Pickle- Amla aids digestion and breaks down food into smaller particles, in addition to facilitating better absorption of nutrients from food. Ingredients such as coriander seeds, fennel seeds and ajwain aid digestion and relieve indigestion. Amla Pickle is made with diabetic safe ingredients. Ajwain’s active enzymes increase the flow of stomach acids, which can help relieve indigestion, bloating, and gas.

gut health food

5. Moong dal Khichdi- Khichdi is a filling dish. Moong dal is rich in

Fiber,

· Vitamin C,

Calcium,

Magnesium,

Potassium,

· And phosphorus.

Freshly cooked khichdi topped with desi ghee contains the right balance of

Macronutrients,

complex carbohydrates,

· Proteins and fats.

Rice has a high glycemic load, but this is offset by the healing fats and fibers found in ghee and dal.

Also read: 3 healthy breakfast recipes to start the day right

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intestine: manage your intestinal problems during the winter with these effective tips https://gut-training.com/intestine-manage-your-intestinal-problems-during-the-winter-with-these-effective-tips/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 10:54:00 +0000 https://gut-training.com/intestine-manage-your-intestinal-problems-during-the-winter-with-these-effective-tips/ The winter season brings cooler and pleasant weather, as well as a multitude of health problems. During the winter, not only are respiratory problems, joint and muscle pain, and skin infections common, but stomach problems are also common. Gut health, for those unfamiliar, refers to the balance of microorganisms in the digestive tract. Therefore, maintaining […]]]>
The winter season brings cooler and pleasant weather, as well as a multitude of health problems. During the winter, not only are respiratory problems, joint and muscle pain, and skin infections common, but stomach problems are also common. Gut health, for those unfamiliar, refers to the balance of microorganisms in the digestive tract. Therefore, maintaining the proper balance of these microorganisms and managing gut health will help improve overall health. Were you aware of this? The intestinal flora or intestinal microbiome refers to the bacteria, yeasts and viruses present in the digestive tract. Therefore, taking care of your gut is essential, especially during the colder months when your digestive system is suffering.

Wellness Advocate and Nutrition Coach Eshanka Wahi suggests seven ways to manage your gut issues during winters are as follows-

1]Stick to a well-balanced diet – It is important to include all essential nutrients in your diet. Choose foods rich in vitamin C such as

· Sweet potatoes

Pumpkin, carrots,

· And beets to boost your immune system in the colder months.

Eating green leafy vegetables is also a good idea.

Kale,

Mustard leaves,

· Brussels sprouts,

Fenugreek,

· And spinach should all be included in your diet.

These ingredients have also been used in curries and soups. These ingredients can also be used in the stuffing mix for parathas. Green vegetables are high in fiber, which helps regulate bowel movements and digestion. As a result, you’ll feel fuller and less likely to eat junk food. So, eat these foods to improve your overall health.

2]Avoid processed junk food – If you want to keep your digestive health in check, you will need to reduce your intake of sugar, processed foods, and alcohol. Junk food is bad for the digestive system as it slows down digestion and causes bloating. The stomach needs enzymes to digest food, which is not

present in fast food. When food is absorbed through the gut, fiber and water are needed for excretion, but they lack these nutrients, leading to poor digestion and irritable bowel syndrome.

3]Sleep well – When we sleep, we allow our bodies to repair themselves and return to their optimal state. It helps you prepare for the next day’s activities. Good sleep also means fewer unhealthy food cravings, better stress management, fewer hormonal fluctuations, and less weight gain. Sleep deprivation can make you feel lethargic and exhausted.

4]Stay hydrated – When the temperature suddenly drops, fluid intake tends to decrease. Drinking enough water will help flush out all toxins from your body and negatively impact your immune system. Your intestines stiffen up and make it harder to pass food if you don’t drink enough water or fluids. Increase your fluid intake by eating stews and soups. Radishes and tomatoes, which are water-based vegetables, are also beneficial.

5]Opt for Fermented Foods – You’ll be less likely to drink iced kombucha as the weather gets colder and the winter months approach, but that doesn’t mean you should stop eating fermented foods that are high in carbs altogether. probiotics. Find fermented foods that you can easily incorporate into your winter menu to maintain your intake of these gut-friendly foods. Consider miso for soup, kefir for drinks, tempeh for stir-fries, and kimchi or sauerkraut as a side dish.

6]Reduce stress – Stress has a negative impact on the digestive system. So try to relax by doing

Yoga

Meditation

· Or other exercises like walking.

You can also relax doing whatever you want. Try activities like listening to music, cooking, photographing, or even dancing.

7]Exercise Regularly – Exercising regularly helps with heart health and weight loss or maintenance. It also improves our gut health which helps in controlling obesity.

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Infection in Pregnant Mice Increases Risk of Gut Problems in Puppies | Spectrum https://gut-training.com/infection-in-pregnant-mice-increases-risk-of-gut-problems-in-puppies-spectrum/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 12:02:40 +0000 https://gut-training.com/infection-in-pregnant-mice-increases-risk-of-gut-problems-in-puppies-spectrum/ Immune boost: Alterations in the gut microbiome of a mother mouse can instill an overactive immune response in her offspring. IKELOS GmbH/Dr. Christopher B. Jackson/Scientific Source Pregnant mice that develop an immune reaction have offspring with autism-like traits and a increased susceptibility to intestinal inflammation, according to a new study. Findings May Help Explain Why […]]]>
Immune boost: Alterations in the gut microbiome of a mother mouse can instill an overactive immune response in her offspring.

IKELOS GmbH/Dr. Christopher B. Jackson/Scientific Source

Pregnant mice that develop an immune reaction have offspring with autism-like traits and a increased susceptibility to intestinal inflammation, according to a new study.

Findings May Help Explain Why Many Autistic People Have Gastrointestinal Problems, Study Investigator Says Eunha Kim, postdoctoral researcher in june eh‘s lab at Harvard University.

Previous work has shown that prenatal exposure to the maternal immune response – brought about by viral mimicry – induces autism-like traits in mice. And a serious infection or an overactive immune system during pregnancy increases the likelihood of having an autistic child, other studies show.

But a different mechanism underlies gut problems, Kim and her colleagues found. They come from alterations in the mother’s gut microbiome – the mix of microbes that inhabit the stomach and intestines – to which puppies are exposed after birth. The mother’s atypical gut microbiome, in turn, causes the puppies’ immune system to overreact to infections later on.

Studying this newly identified mechanism may help researchers better understand how maternal immune activation and autism are linked to other conditions, such as allergies, says John Lukens, associate professor of neuroscience at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. Lukens was not involved in the study but wrote about the results in a article preview.

“It could be some kind of evolutionary advantage that went haywire,” he says.

Kim and his colleagues injected pregnant mice with either a fake virus or a saline solution. As adults, male offspring exposed to the fake virus exhibited atypical social behaviors, similar to those seen in people with autism.

The team then infected the adult offspring with the bacteria Citrobacteria rodentium, which can cause an inflammatory bowel condition resembling colitis. Ten days after infection, animals of both sexes exposed to the dummy virus had shortened colons – a sign of colitis – and increased levels of the inflammatory immune molecule IL-17A.

When mice born to mock-virus-treated mothers were reared by saline-injected mothers, they still exhibited autism-like behaviors, but they no longer produced a rapid inflammatory response to a pathogen. The offspring of saline-treated mice that were reared by mock virus-treated mothers, on the other hand, did – suggesting that the enhanced immune response is acquired after birth. The findings were published in Immunity December 7.

One way a mother influences her offspring’s immune system during typical development is through the gut microbiota. Mice, in particular, eat the feces of their cagemates, which changes the contents of their gut. In this way, changes to a mother mouse’s microbiome can disrupt the establishment of her pup’s immune system.

Mice treated with a fake virus, Kim and his colleagues found, have an atypical and less diverse gut microbiome than their saline-injected counterparts. And the germ-free mice that received a fecal transplant from mice treated with a fake virus went on to have their own offspring with an enhanced immune response, further involving the microbiome of the mothers.

Puppies raised by mothers with this atypical and less diverse microbiome have altered helper T cells, which release IL-17A and other immune molecules to sound the alarm for other immune cells after exposure to a pathogen. The study shows that the T cells in these puppies have differences in the accessibility of their chromatin – the tightly coiled form of DNA – which causes them to produce an unusually high level of IL-17A, and therefore inflammation, in response to an immune system. system challenge.

Injecting pregnant mice with a compound that blocks IL-17A before treating them with the fake virus prevented the pups they raised from having a heightened immune response to further infection, the researcher found. team, confirming the involvement of the immune molecule.

JAlthough the study doesn’t explain how autism arises in people, “it does give you insight into the role of early microbes in immune reactivity,” says Jane Foster, professor of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience at McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada, who was not involved in the study.

IL-17A often appears in studies of atypical immune responses and autism, and previous work by Kim’s colleagues found that blocking IL-17A in pregnant mice that undergo maternal immune activation prevents their puppies to develop autism-like traits.

Likewise, “blocking IL-17A activity may be a potential therapeutic target” for preventing gastrointestinal problems in some children, Kim says. But because the molecule has many other functions, “this needs to be studied in more detail,” she says.

A safer option, says Lukens, may be to try to normalize a mother’s gut microbiome with a specific diet or probiotics.

But it’s unclear how the microbiome would need to change to achieve this goal. “The thing that’s missing here is that they haven’t mapped these microbes” to identify which ones are important, Foster says.

Kim and her colleagues plan to look into that next. They also plan to explore whether these findings hold in children exposed to a maternal immune response, Kim says.

Cite this article: https://doi.org/10.53053/YNWN9651

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5 Indian dishes to cure your intestinal problems https://gut-training.com/5-indian-dishes-to-cure-your-intestinal-problems/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 11:20:11 +0000 https://gut-training.com/5-indian-dishes-to-cure-your-intestinal-problems/ Image: Shutterstock We all know that a healthy gut is the key to living a happy life and having a healthy body. Fortunately, Indian cuisine has plenty of options to include all the fiber and protein you need for a healthy gut. Dr Rohini Patil, founder of Nutracy Lifestyle, lists a few dishes that may […]]]>

Image: Shutterstock

We all know that a healthy gut is the key to living a happy life and having a healthy body. Fortunately, Indian cuisine has plenty of options to include all the fiber and protein you need for a healthy gut. Dr Rohini Patil, founder of Nutracy Lifestyle, lists a few dishes that may do the trick.

You will find that your ancestors have been preparing these dishes for years, and you can also easily learn how to prepare them yourself. You’ve been savoring them since you were a kid, and now that you know they help relax core issues, you can devour them with more fervor.
So, today, on the menu we have:

Khichdi

Khichdi

Image: Shutterstock

No, not the show, although that can help too, but the dish can help soothe your digestive tract. Rice has a high glycemic load, but it is balanced by the healing fats and fibers of ghee and dal. The dish was mentioned in satvik diet for a healthy and healthy gut with other benefits like providing fiber. It helps fight constipation, loose movements, and vomiting. The nutritional value and health benefits increase dramatically when you add vegetables to your khichdi.

Curd Rice

Curd Rice

Image: Shutterstock

Curd rice is considered to be one of the best home remedies for bowel problems. The probiotic nature of crud makes this dish a great solution for indigestion. The curd is filled with good bacteria which aid in better digestion and also promote weight loss. White rice is easy to digest and absorbs all of the flavors of the curd without affecting its health benefits. Curd rice supports the balance of healthy microbiology in your body.

Idli

Idli

Image: Shutterstock

This popular South Indian dish has been used for ages to improve gut health. In addition to containing a lot of gut bacteria, idlis are low in calories, making them a healthy option for breakfast. Eating them with chutney that contains fermented ingredients improves their overall probiotic benefits. The texture and taste make it easier for children and the elderly to consume idlis.

Amla Murabba

Amla Murabba

Image: Shutterstock

In addition to facilitating better absorption of nutrients from food, amla facilitates digestion and breaking down food into smaller particles. The high fiber content makes this murabba extremely beneficial for digestive and gastrointestinal issues including constipation and gastritis.

Moong Dal

Moong Dal

Image: Shutterstock

Butyrate, a fatty acid that moong dal produces in your body, has anti-inflammatory properties that reduce gas changes that build up. This fatty acid is created when the good bacteria in your gut break down dietary fiber. In addition to providing a lot of protein and iron, moong Dal is also easy to digest.

Read also : Want to indulge in delicious home cooked meals? Learn how to prepare your meals

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Jada Pinkett Smith discusses bowel issues and the first colonoscopy https://gut-training.com/jada-pinkett-smith-discusses-bowel-issues-and-the-first-colonoscopy/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://gut-training.com/jada-pinkett-smith-discusses-bowel-issues-and-the-first-colonoscopy/ In an episode of Facebook Watch Red table talk Jada pinkett smith discussed the debilitating brain and bowel symptoms she experienced that made eating and functioning difficult. Pinkett Smith revealed the significant cuts she made to her diet that helped her mood and gut health improve. The actress also shared her first colonoscopy during the […]]]>
  • In an episode of Facebook Watch Red table talk Jada pinkett smith discussed the debilitating brain and bowel symptoms she experienced that made eating and functioning difficult.
  • Pinkett Smith revealed the significant cuts she made to her diet that helped her mood and gut health improve.
  • The actress also shared her first colonoscopy during the episode and urged viewers to get theirs at 45.

    In a recent episode of Facebook Watch Red table talk aired on December 21 Jada pinkett smith not only shared her first colonoscopy with viewers (as in, she filmed the procedure!),

    In the episode, the actress, who just turned 50, sat at the table with her mother Adrienne Banfield Norris and her son Jaden Smith to discuss their gut issues and hear from experts in the field. She revealed the changes she made to ease her upset stomach, including cutting out gluten, eggs, chicken and oatmeal for a happier brain and gut, according to the star.

    It was a big change for Pinkett smith, since his usual breakfast was oatmeal. “I will have [oatmeal] every morning and trying to figure out why I was so low, so low, so depressed. I mean literally dragging your feet through life, ”she said in the music video.

    She even noted that her “number one bowel problem [was] no appetite and discomfort “so she” would rather not eat. “But since changing her diet, she said she felt” happy. “

    Although not all oatmeal products contain gluten, she found that gluten took a toll on her emotional state, and cutting it out of her meals helped her feel better both physically and emotionally. “Once I got rid of gluten, I started to realize how happy I have become. How emotionally happy I have become, ” Pinkett smith noted. “Now I wake up in the morning ready to go, happy, let’s go. “

    This link between gut and brain health is nothing new: Doctors have long studied the association between the two. “This is the concept that there are physical and chemical connections between our central nervous system, our brain and our gut.” Folasade P. May, MD, Ph.D., MPhil, explained a gastroenterologist at UCLA in the episode. “There are millions of nerve endings in our stomach, in our colon, in our digestive system. There is two-way communication at all times.

    Pinkett smith agreed with Dr. May’s explanation and felt validated in her own experience of feeling weak due to her intestinal symptoms. “They say the gut is like the second brain in the body”, Pinkett smith said in a clip. “I wish I had known earlier. I think people should also understand better that we are putting toxic food in our body, it will help to create toxic emotions, toxic moods. I see it in my own eating lifestyle.

    Dr May also explained the importance of getting tested for Colon Cancer, the second cancer-related death in America, and encouraged viewers to make an appointment after the age of 45. Although previous recommendations suggested that 50 was a suitable year to get tested, new colorectal cancer screening guidelines revised recommendations in response to an increase colorectal cancer among the youngest.

    Additionally, symptoms such as blood in the stool, regular nausea or vomiting, weight loss, severe constipation, hard stools, and loose, watery stools can be signs of a bowel problem and should be noted. treated with your doctor, explained Dr. May. in the clip.

    This content is created and maintained by a third party, and uploaded to this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and other similar content on piano.io

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Jada Pinkett Smith Opens Up About Her Bowel Problems – Eat This, Not That https://gut-training.com/jada-pinkett-smith-opens-up-about-her-bowel-problems-eat-this-not-that/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 12:16:56 +0000 https://gut-training.com/jada-pinkett-smith-opens-up-about-her-bowel-problems-eat-this-not-that/ When your gut is not healthy, it can lead to various problems. Jada pinkett smith– who along with 70 million other Americans suffer from digestive problems – knows it well, which is why she opened up about her bowel problems on her Dec. 22 episode of “Red Table Talk” on Facebook Watch. In addition to […]]]>

When your gut is not healthy, it can lead to various problems. Jada pinkett smith– who along with 70 million other Americans suffer from digestive problems – knows it well, which is why she opened up about her bowel problems on her Dec. 22 episode of “Red Table Talk” on Facebook Watch.

In addition to undergoing a colonoscopy to help determine what bowel issues she was potentially facing, the actress and host also spoke with experts to find out how gut health can affect everything from weight gain to problems with breast cancer. stomach through bloating, fatigue, pain, migraines and food. allergic. On top of that, it can also affect your brain.

“They say the gut is like the second brain in the body,” Pinkett Smith said in an exclusive clip provided to Eat this, not that! “I think people should also understand better that we are putting toxic foods in our bodies, [and that’s] will help create toxic emotions, toxic moods. “

Related: Sign up for our newsletter to receive the latest news on celebrity diet and health!

Going on to say that she solved her intestinal issues by cutting out gluten, eggs, chicken, and oatmeal, Pinkett Smith revealed that after getting rid of the latter for breakfast, she is now starting. her days feeling “happy” and motivated instead of feeling “so low, so low, [and] so depressed. “

“This is the concept that there are physical and chemical connections between our central nervous system – our brain – and our gut,” UCLA gastroenterologist Dr. Fola May noted during the episode. full. She added that “there are millions of nerve endings in our stomach, colon and digestive system” as well as “two-way communication” between these areas “at all times.” It is because of these connections that the state of our gut affects our mental state.

Shawn M. Talbott, PhD, author of Mental fitness: maximizing mood, motivation and mental well-being by optimizing the brain-body biome, recount Eat this, not that!: “I often tell people that ‘what you feel is not only in your head, but also in your gut’ because the majority of our neurotransmitters are made in our gut – 90% of our serotonin (happiness), 70% of our dopamine (motivation), most of our GABA (relaxation), etc. “

Justin carter

Talbott adds that “by managing our gut bacteria (microbiome) and optimizing our gut health, we can improve how we feel, with less stress and greater resistance to stress.”

As for how to keep your gut healthy, Jumha Aburezeq, head nutrition coach at StoopidFit, offers some advice: sugar intake, minimizing the use of NSAIDs or PPIS (aspirin, ibuprofen, advil, motrin, prilosec, and nexium all weaken the intestinal lining), by incorporating more foods rich in fiber and protein into your diet, getting 7-9 hours of sleep at night and dealing with your daily stress (mental, emotional and physical stress). all create inflammation in the body). “

To learn more about how to keep your gut healthy, be sure to read Eating Habits To Avoid If You Want A Healthy Gut, Dietitians Say.

And tune in for a brand new episode of “Red Table Talk” Wednesday, December 22 at 9 p.m. PT / 12 p.m. ET on Facebook Watch.

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Maternal inflammation could link autism and gut problems, mouse study suggests https://gut-training.com/maternal-inflammation-could-link-autism-and-gut-problems-mouse-study-suggests/ Wed, 08 Dec 2021 11:23:21 +0000 https://gut-training.com/maternal-inflammation-could-link-autism-and-gut-problems-mouse-study-suggests/ Although many people with autism spectrum disorders also suffer from unusual gastrointestinal inflammation, scientists have not established how these conditions might be related. Now researchers at Harvard Medical School and MIT, working with mouse models, may have found the connection: When a mother suffers from an infection during pregnancy and her immune system produces high […]]]>

Although many people with autism spectrum disorders also suffer from unusual gastrointestinal inflammation, scientists have not established how these conditions might be related. Now researchers at Harvard Medical School and MIT, working with mouse models, may have found the connection: When a mother suffers from an infection during pregnancy and her immune system produces high levels of the Interleukin-17a (IL-17a) molecule, it can not only alter the development of the brain of her fetus, but also alter her microbiome so that after birth, the newborn’s immune system can prepare for future inflammatory attacks.

In four studies starting in 2016, co-lead authors Gloria Choi of MIT and Jun Huh of Harvard tracked how IL-17a elevated during pregnancy acts on neural receptors in a specific region of the fetal brain to alter the development of the brain. circuit, leading to autism -like behavioral symptoms in mouse models. New research published Dec. 7 in Immunity shows how IL-17a can act to alter the developmental trajectory of the immune system as well.

“We have shown that IL-17a acting on the fetal brain can induce autism-like behavioral phenotypes, such as social deficits,” said Choi, Mark Hyman Jr. associate professor of career development at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory and the Brain Department. and cognitive science at MIT. “Now we are showing that the same IL-17a in mothers, through changes in the microbiome community, produces comorbid symptoms such as a primed immune system. “

Researchers warn that study results have yet to be confirmed in humans, but suggest central nervous system and immune system problems in people with autism spectrum disorders share a factor environmental: maternal infection during pregnancy.

“There has been no mechanistic understanding of why patients with neurodevelopmental disorder have deregulated immune systems,” said Huh, associate professor of immunology at Harvard Medical School. “We have tied these fragmented links together. This may be because they were exposed to this increased inflammation during pregnancy.

Eunha Kim and Donggi Paik of Huh’s lab are the study’s lead co-authors.

Time tracking

The research team first confirmed that maternal immune activation (MIA) causes increased susceptibility to intestinal inflammation in offspring by injecting pregnant mice with poly (I: C), a substance that mimics l ‘viral infection. Their offspring, but not offspring from dams in an unaffected control group, exhibited autism-like symptoms, as expected, as well as gut inflammation when exposed to other inflammatory stimuli.

While the neurodevelopmental aberrations the team tracked occur while the fetus is still in the womb, it was not clear when the altered immune responses developed. To find out, the team changed the mouse puppies at birth so that those born to MIA mothers were raised by control mothers and those born to control mothers were raised by MIA mothers. The team found that puppies born to MIA mothers but raised by control mothers exhibited symptoms of autism but not gut inflammation. Puppies born to control dams but raised by MIA dams did not show symptoms of autism, but did experience intestinal inflammation. The results showed that if neurodevelopment is altered before birth, the immune response is altered after birth.

Microbiome-mediated molecular mechanism

The question then became how MIA moms have this postnatal effect on puppies. Other studies have shown that the maternal microbiome can influence the development of the offspring’s immune system. To test whether this was the case in the MIA model, the researchers looked at the stools of MIA and control mice and found that the diversity of microbial communities was significantly different.

Then, to determine if those differences played a causal role, they raised a new set of female mice in a “germ-free” environment, which means they don’t carry any germs in or on their bodies. Then the scientists transplanted stool from MIA or control mothers into these germ-free mothers and crossed them with males. Unlike controls, puppies born to mothers who underwent MIA stool transfer exhibited intestinal inflammation. These results indicated that the altered microbiome of MIA moms leads to immune priming of the offspring.

Among the notable differences the team measured in the gut inflammatory response was an increased production of IL-17a by T cells in the immune system. IL-17a is the same cytokine whose levels are upregulated in MIA mothers. When the scientists examined T cells from offspring exposed to the MIA microbiome compared to control offspring, they found that in MIA offspring, CD4 T cells were more likely to differentiate into Th17 cells, which release IL. -17a.

This prompted them to examine the potential differences in the way CD4 T cells from different groups transcribe their genes. CD4 T cells exposed to the MIA microbiome exhibited higher expression of genes for T cell activation, suggesting that they were more primed for T cell-dependent immune responses in response to infections.

“Thus, the increase in IL-17a in mothers during pregnancy leads to a susceptibility to produce more IL-17a in the offspring during immune challenge,” Choi said.

Having established that offspring’s immune systems can be malfunctioned by exposure to the altered microbiome of an infected mother during pregnancy, the question that remained was how this microbiome is altered in the first place. Suspecting IL-17a, the team tested the effects of antibodies that block the cytokine. When they blocked IL-17a in dams prior to immune activation, their offspring did not exhibit intestinal inflammation later in life. This was also found to be true when the researchers repeated the experiment of transplanting MIA stools to germ-free mothers, this time including stools from MIA mothers with IL-17a blockers. Again, blocking IL-17a in the midst of maternal infection led to a microbiome that did not poorly prepare the offspring’s immune system.

Long-term issues

Huh said the results underscore that environmental exposures during pregnancy, such as infections, can have long-term consequences on the health of the offspring, a concern that has always been present but may be exacerbated by the pandemic of Covid-19. Further study is needed, he said, to determine the long-term effects on children born to mothers infected with SARS-Cov-2.

Choi added that emerging links between inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s may also warrant further study given the team’s findings on how maternal infection can lead to increased inflammation. in the offspring.

Reference: Kim E, Paik D, Ramirez RN, et al. Maternal gut bacteria cause gut inflammation in offspring with neurodevelopmental disorders by altering the chromatin landscape of CD4 + T cells. Immunity. 2021; 0 (0). doi: 10.1016 / j.immuni.2021.11.005

This article was republished from the following materials. Note: Material may have been edited for length and content. For more information, please contact the cited source.

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Five Indian foods to cure your intestinal problems https://gut-training.com/five-indian-foods-to-cure-your-intestinal-problems/ Wed, 08 Dec 2021 06:00:16 +0000 https://gut-training.com/five-indian-foods-to-cure-your-intestinal-problems/ Your gut health is linked to your overall health, which is why doctors always advise you to include gut-friendly foods in your diet. It can also help boost your immunity. While the occasional consumption of junk food like pizza and burgers is okay, it shouldn’t become a habit. According to Dr Rohini Patil, nutritionist and […]]]>

Your gut health is linked to your overall health, which is why doctors always advise you to include gut-friendly foods in your diet. It can also help boost your immunity. While the occasional consumption of junk food like pizza and burgers is okay, it shouldn’t become a habit.

According to Dr Rohini Patil, nutritionist and author of The lifestyle diet, it’s important to know how gut health affects your overall well-being.

“Give your gut the care and nourishment it needs. How do you know if your gut is healthy or unhealthy? There are signs that your gut health needs better nutrition and better care, ”she says.

* Fatigue, vomiting, constipation, gas or irregular bowel movements.
* Having an upset stomach, bloating.
* Unintentional weight loss or weight gain.
* Skin problems caused by poor diet.
* Lack of sleep or fatigue.

It is a known fact that foods of a probiotic nature are necessary for a healthy gut. “Probiotics not only help improve the gut, but also maintain it. Yogurt, kimchi, and miso are among the foods that are probiotic in nature. But, these foods are not readily available for everyone in India. Fortunately, Indian cuisine offers probiotic dishes that are easily accessible to everyone, ”explains Dr Patil.

1. Rasam: The ingredients found in rasam like dal, tamarind, herbs, and spices are packed with vitamins A, C, magnesium, iron, and calcium which are great for your digestive system. Rasam also contains fibers which facilitate intestinal transit and facilitate the evacuation of stool.

2. Kadhi: Besan kadhi, also known as kadhi, is full of magnesium and fiber which are essential for good gut health. It is also a home remedy for menstrual cramps, constipation, and weight loss.

3. Methi sabzi: Fenugreek is a must; it helps to lose weight, fight against constipation and other problems related to the intestines. The fiber in methi takes a long time to break down, which gives our gut enough time to absorb nutrients.

4. Karele ki sabzi: If cooked properly, karele ki sabzi is a delicious dish filled with fiber and nutrients that work like magic for constipation, indigestion. It is an excellent immunity booster.

5. Dhokla: You will have better bowel movements and your energy level will improve as well. Additionally, dhokla helps balance gut bacteria. The texture and taste of dhokla makes it easier to consume by the elderly and children.

On top of that, exercise, yoga, and staying hydrated can play an important role in gut health, the doctor concludes.

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Chewing gum after surgery may reduce bowel problems – Consumer Health News https://gut-training.com/chewing-gum-after-surgery-may-reduce-bowel-problems-consumer-health-news/ Tue, 21 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://gut-training.com/chewing-gum-after-surgery-may-reduce-bowel-problems-consumer-health-news/ TUESDAY, September 21, 2021 (HealthDay News) – Chewing gum after heart surgery may relieve postoperative bowel problems, according to a study presented at the annual Perioperative and Critical Care conference, hosted by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and held virtually from September 10 to 11. Sirivan Seng, MD, of Crozer-Chester Medical Center in Upland, Pa., […]]]>

TUESDAY, September 21, 2021 (HealthDay News) – Chewing gum after heart surgery may relieve postoperative bowel problems, according to a study presented at the annual Perioperative and Critical Care conference, hosted by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and held virtually from September 10 to 11.

Sirivan Seng, MD, of Crozer-Chester Medical Center in Upland, Pa., And colleagues asked 379 consecutive patients undergoing heart surgery from 2017 to 2020 to chew a piece of gum three times a day for five to 10 minutes once. deemed stable to participate. Postoperative ileus rates were compared between this cohort and 496 patients who underwent similar elective cardiac surgeries between 2013 and 2016.

The researchers found that in the chewing gum cohort, two patients (0.59%) had abdominal distension on physical examination and an x-ray confirmed postoperative ileus that required treatment compared to 17 patients (3.43%). in the 2013 to 2016 cohort. This difference in postoperative ileus was statistically significant. Chewing gum has not been associated with any complications.

“Before our study, there was no previously published study on the use of chewing gum in patients with heart surgery, but we found that it could speed up the return of bowel function,” said Seng in a statement. “Considering the minimal risk and extremely insignificant cost of this procedure, incorporating chewing gum after cardiac surgery should be strongly regarded as a new standard of care.”

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