Gut problems – Gut Training http://gut-training.com/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 08:40:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.2 https://gut-training.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png Gut problems – Gut Training http://gut-training.com/ 32 32 5 Indian dishes to cure your intestinal problems https://gut-training.com/5-indian-dishes-to-cure-your-intestinal-problems/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 11:20:11 +0000 https://gut-training.com/5-indian-dishes-to-cure-your-intestinal-problems/ Image: Shutterstock We all know that a healthy gut is the key to living a happy life and having a healthy body. Fortunately, Indian cuisine has plenty of options to include all the fiber and protein you need for a healthy gut. Dr Rohini Patil, founder of Nutracy Lifestyle, lists a few dishes that may […]]]>

Image: Shutterstock

We all know that a healthy gut is the key to living a happy life and having a healthy body. Fortunately, Indian cuisine has plenty of options to include all the fiber and protein you need for a healthy gut. Dr Rohini Patil, founder of Nutracy Lifestyle, lists a few dishes that may do the trick.

You will find that your ancestors have been preparing these dishes for years, and you can also easily learn how to prepare them yourself. You’ve been savoring them since you were a kid, and now that you know they help relax core issues, you can devour them with more fervor.
So, today, on the menu we have:

Khichdi

Khichdi

Image: Shutterstock

No, not the show, although that can help too, but the dish can help soothe your digestive tract. Rice has a high glycemic load, but it is balanced by the healing fats and fibers of ghee and dal. The dish was mentioned in satvik diet for a healthy and healthy gut with other benefits like providing fiber. It helps fight constipation, loose movements, and vomiting. The nutritional value and health benefits increase dramatically when you add vegetables to your khichdi.

Curd Rice

Curd Rice

Image: Shutterstock

Curd rice is considered to be one of the best home remedies for bowel problems. The probiotic nature of crud makes this dish a great solution for indigestion. The curd is filled with good bacteria which aid in better digestion and also promote weight loss. White rice is easy to digest and absorbs all of the flavors of the curd without affecting its health benefits. Curd rice supports the balance of healthy microbiology in your body.

Idli

Idli

Image: Shutterstock

This popular South Indian dish has been used for ages to improve gut health. In addition to containing a lot of gut bacteria, idlis are low in calories, making them a healthy option for breakfast. Eating them with chutney that contains fermented ingredients improves their overall probiotic benefits. The texture and taste make it easier for children and the elderly to consume idlis.

Amla Murabba

Amla Murabba

Image: Shutterstock

In addition to facilitating better absorption of nutrients from food, amla facilitates digestion and breaking down food into smaller particles. The high fiber content makes this murabba extremely beneficial for digestive and gastrointestinal issues including constipation and gastritis.

Moong Dal

Moong Dal

Image: Shutterstock

Butyrate, a fatty acid that moong dal produces in your body, has anti-inflammatory properties that reduce gas changes that build up. This fatty acid is created when the good bacteria in your gut break down dietary fiber. In addition to providing a lot of protein and iron, moong Dal is also easy to digest.

Read also : Want to indulge in delicious home cooked meals? Learn how to prepare your meals

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Jada Pinkett Smith discusses bowel issues and the first colonoscopy https://gut-training.com/jada-pinkett-smith-discusses-bowel-issues-and-the-first-colonoscopy/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://gut-training.com/jada-pinkett-smith-discusses-bowel-issues-and-the-first-colonoscopy/ In an episode of Facebook Watch Red table talk Jada pinkett smith discussed the debilitating brain and bowel symptoms she experienced that made eating and functioning difficult. Pinkett Smith revealed the significant cuts she made to her diet that helped her mood and gut health improve. The actress also shared her first colonoscopy during the […]]]>
  • In an episode of Facebook Watch Red table talk Jada pinkett smith discussed the debilitating brain and bowel symptoms she experienced that made eating and functioning difficult.
  • Pinkett Smith revealed the significant cuts she made to her diet that helped her mood and gut health improve.
  • The actress also shared her first colonoscopy during the episode and urged viewers to get theirs at 45.

    In a recent episode of Facebook Watch Red table talk aired on December 21 Jada pinkett smith not only shared her first colonoscopy with viewers (as in, she filmed the procedure!),

    In the episode, the actress, who just turned 50, sat at the table with her mother Adrienne Banfield Norris and her son Jaden Smith to discuss their gut issues and hear from experts in the field. She revealed the changes she made to ease her upset stomach, including cutting out gluten, eggs, chicken and oatmeal for a happier brain and gut, according to the star.

    It was a big change for Pinkett smith, since his usual breakfast was oatmeal. “I will have [oatmeal] every morning and trying to figure out why I was so low, so low, so depressed. I mean literally dragging your feet through life, ”she said in the music video.

    She even noted that her “number one bowel problem [was] no appetite and discomfort “so she” would rather not eat. “But since changing her diet, she said she felt” happy. “

    Although not all oatmeal products contain gluten, she found that gluten took a toll on her emotional state, and cutting it out of her meals helped her feel better both physically and emotionally. “Once I got rid of gluten, I started to realize how happy I have become. How emotionally happy I have become, ” Pinkett smith noted. “Now I wake up in the morning ready to go, happy, let’s go. “

    This link between gut and brain health is nothing new: Doctors have long studied the association between the two. “This is the concept that there are physical and chemical connections between our central nervous system, our brain and our gut.” Folasade P. May, MD, Ph.D., MPhil, explained a gastroenterologist at UCLA in the episode. “There are millions of nerve endings in our stomach, in our colon, in our digestive system. There is two-way communication at all times.

    Pinkett smith agreed with Dr. May’s explanation and felt validated in her own experience of feeling weak due to her intestinal symptoms. “They say the gut is like the second brain in the body”, Pinkett smith said in a clip. “I wish I had known earlier. I think people should also understand better that we are putting toxic food in our body, it will help to create toxic emotions, toxic moods. I see it in my own eating lifestyle.

    Dr May also explained the importance of getting tested for Colon Cancer, the second cancer-related death in America, and encouraged viewers to make an appointment after the age of 45. Although previous recommendations suggested that 50 was a suitable year to get tested, new colorectal cancer screening guidelines revised recommendations in response to an increase colorectal cancer among the youngest.

    Additionally, symptoms such as blood in the stool, regular nausea or vomiting, weight loss, severe constipation, hard stools, and loose, watery stools can be signs of a bowel problem and should be noted. treated with your doctor, explained Dr. May. in the clip.

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Jada Pinkett Smith Opens Up About Her Bowel Problems – Eat This, Not That https://gut-training.com/jada-pinkett-smith-opens-up-about-her-bowel-problems-eat-this-not-that/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 12:16:56 +0000 https://gut-training.com/jada-pinkett-smith-opens-up-about-her-bowel-problems-eat-this-not-that/ When your gut is not healthy, it can lead to various problems. Jada pinkett smith– who along with 70 million other Americans suffer from digestive problems – knows it well, which is why she opened up about her bowel problems on her Dec. 22 episode of “Red Table Talk” on Facebook Watch. In addition to […]]]>

When your gut is not healthy, it can lead to various problems. Jada pinkett smith– who along with 70 million other Americans suffer from digestive problems – knows it well, which is why she opened up about her bowel problems on her Dec. 22 episode of “Red Table Talk” on Facebook Watch.

In addition to undergoing a colonoscopy to help determine what bowel issues she was potentially facing, the actress and host also spoke with experts to find out how gut health can affect everything from weight gain to problems with breast cancer. stomach through bloating, fatigue, pain, migraines and food. allergic. On top of that, it can also affect your brain.

“They say the gut is like the second brain in the body,” Pinkett Smith said in an exclusive clip provided to Eat this, not that! “I think people should also understand better that we are putting toxic foods in our bodies, [and that’s] will help create toxic emotions, toxic moods. “

Related: Sign up for our newsletter to receive the latest news on celebrity diet and health!

Going on to say that she solved her intestinal issues by cutting out gluten, eggs, chicken, and oatmeal, Pinkett Smith revealed that after getting rid of the latter for breakfast, she is now starting. her days feeling “happy” and motivated instead of feeling “so low, so low, [and] so depressed. “

“This is the concept that there are physical and chemical connections between our central nervous system – our brain – and our gut,” UCLA gastroenterologist Dr. Fola May noted during the episode. full. She added that “there are millions of nerve endings in our stomach, colon and digestive system” as well as “two-way communication” between these areas “at all times.” It is because of these connections that the state of our gut affects our mental state.

Shawn M. Talbott, PhD, author of Mental fitness: maximizing mood, motivation and mental well-being by optimizing the brain-body biome, recount Eat this, not that!: “I often tell people that ‘what you feel is not only in your head, but also in your gut’ because the majority of our neurotransmitters are made in our gut – 90% of our serotonin (happiness), 70% of our dopamine (motivation), most of our GABA (relaxation), etc. “

Justin carter

Talbott adds that “by managing our gut bacteria (microbiome) and optimizing our gut health, we can improve how we feel, with less stress and greater resistance to stress.”

As for how to keep your gut healthy, Jumha Aburezeq, head nutrition coach at StoopidFit, offers some advice: sugar intake, minimizing the use of NSAIDs or PPIS (aspirin, ibuprofen, advil, motrin, prilosec, and nexium all weaken the intestinal lining), by incorporating more foods rich in fiber and protein into your diet, getting 7-9 hours of sleep at night and dealing with your daily stress (mental, emotional and physical stress). all create inflammation in the body). “

To learn more about how to keep your gut healthy, be sure to read Eating Habits To Avoid If You Want A Healthy Gut, Dietitians Say.

And tune in for a brand new episode of “Red Table Talk” Wednesday, December 22 at 9 p.m. PT / 12 p.m. ET on Facebook Watch.

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Maternal inflammation could link autism and gut problems, mouse study suggests https://gut-training.com/maternal-inflammation-could-link-autism-and-gut-problems-mouse-study-suggests/ Wed, 08 Dec 2021 11:23:21 +0000 https://gut-training.com/maternal-inflammation-could-link-autism-and-gut-problems-mouse-study-suggests/ Although many people with autism spectrum disorders also suffer from unusual gastrointestinal inflammation, scientists have not established how these conditions might be related. Now researchers at Harvard Medical School and MIT, working with mouse models, may have found the connection: When a mother suffers from an infection during pregnancy and her immune system produces high […]]]>

Although many people with autism spectrum disorders also suffer from unusual gastrointestinal inflammation, scientists have not established how these conditions might be related. Now researchers at Harvard Medical School and MIT, working with mouse models, may have found the connection: When a mother suffers from an infection during pregnancy and her immune system produces high levels of the Interleukin-17a (IL-17a) molecule, it can not only alter the development of the brain of her fetus, but also alter her microbiome so that after birth, the newborn’s immune system can prepare for future inflammatory attacks.

In four studies starting in 2016, co-lead authors Gloria Choi of MIT and Jun Huh of Harvard tracked how IL-17a elevated during pregnancy acts on neural receptors in a specific region of the fetal brain to alter the development of the brain. circuit, leading to autism -like behavioral symptoms in mouse models. New research published Dec. 7 in Immunity shows how IL-17a can act to alter the developmental trajectory of the immune system as well.

“We have shown that IL-17a acting on the fetal brain can induce autism-like behavioral phenotypes, such as social deficits,” said Choi, Mark Hyman Jr. associate professor of career development at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory and the Brain Department. and cognitive science at MIT. “Now we are showing that the same IL-17a in mothers, through changes in the microbiome community, produces comorbid symptoms such as a primed immune system. “

Researchers warn that study results have yet to be confirmed in humans, but suggest central nervous system and immune system problems in people with autism spectrum disorders share a factor environmental: maternal infection during pregnancy.

“There has been no mechanistic understanding of why patients with neurodevelopmental disorder have deregulated immune systems,” said Huh, associate professor of immunology at Harvard Medical School. “We have tied these fragmented links together. This may be because they were exposed to this increased inflammation during pregnancy.

Eunha Kim and Donggi Paik of Huh’s lab are the study’s lead co-authors.

Time tracking

The research team first confirmed that maternal immune activation (MIA) causes increased susceptibility to intestinal inflammation in offspring by injecting pregnant mice with poly (I: C), a substance that mimics l ‘viral infection. Their offspring, but not offspring from dams in an unaffected control group, exhibited autism-like symptoms, as expected, as well as gut inflammation when exposed to other inflammatory stimuli.

While the neurodevelopmental aberrations the team tracked occur while the fetus is still in the womb, it was not clear when the altered immune responses developed. To find out, the team changed the mouse puppies at birth so that those born to MIA mothers were raised by control mothers and those born to control mothers were raised by MIA mothers. The team found that puppies born to MIA mothers but raised by control mothers exhibited symptoms of autism but not gut inflammation. Puppies born to control dams but raised by MIA dams did not show symptoms of autism, but did experience intestinal inflammation. The results showed that if neurodevelopment is altered before birth, the immune response is altered after birth.

Microbiome-mediated molecular mechanism

The question then became how MIA moms have this postnatal effect on puppies. Other studies have shown that the maternal microbiome can influence the development of the offspring’s immune system. To test whether this was the case in the MIA model, the researchers looked at the stools of MIA and control mice and found that the diversity of microbial communities was significantly different.

Then, to determine if those differences played a causal role, they raised a new set of female mice in a “germ-free” environment, which means they don’t carry any germs in or on their bodies. Then the scientists transplanted stool from MIA or control mothers into these germ-free mothers and crossed them with males. Unlike controls, puppies born to mothers who underwent MIA stool transfer exhibited intestinal inflammation. These results indicated that the altered microbiome of MIA moms leads to immune priming of the offspring.

Among the notable differences the team measured in the gut inflammatory response was an increased production of IL-17a by T cells in the immune system. IL-17a is the same cytokine whose levels are upregulated in MIA mothers. When the scientists examined T cells from offspring exposed to the MIA microbiome compared to control offspring, they found that in MIA offspring, CD4 T cells were more likely to differentiate into Th17 cells, which release IL. -17a.

This prompted them to examine the potential differences in the way CD4 T cells from different groups transcribe their genes. CD4 T cells exposed to the MIA microbiome exhibited higher expression of genes for T cell activation, suggesting that they were more primed for T cell-dependent immune responses in response to infections.

“Thus, the increase in IL-17a in mothers during pregnancy leads to a susceptibility to produce more IL-17a in the offspring during immune challenge,” Choi said.

Having established that offspring’s immune systems can be malfunctioned by exposure to the altered microbiome of an infected mother during pregnancy, the question that remained was how this microbiome is altered in the first place. Suspecting IL-17a, the team tested the effects of antibodies that block the cytokine. When they blocked IL-17a in dams prior to immune activation, their offspring did not exhibit intestinal inflammation later in life. This was also found to be true when the researchers repeated the experiment of transplanting MIA stools to germ-free mothers, this time including stools from MIA mothers with IL-17a blockers. Again, blocking IL-17a in the midst of maternal infection led to a microbiome that did not poorly prepare the offspring’s immune system.

Long-term issues

Huh said the results underscore that environmental exposures during pregnancy, such as infections, can have long-term consequences on the health of the offspring, a concern that has always been present but may be exacerbated by the pandemic of Covid-19. Further study is needed, he said, to determine the long-term effects on children born to mothers infected with SARS-Cov-2.

Choi added that emerging links between inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s may also warrant further study given the team’s findings on how maternal infection can lead to increased inflammation. in the offspring.

Reference: Kim E, Paik D, Ramirez RN, et al. Maternal gut bacteria cause gut inflammation in offspring with neurodevelopmental disorders by altering the chromatin landscape of CD4 + T cells. Immunity. 2021; 0 (0). doi: 10.1016 / j.immuni.2021.11.005

This article was republished from the following materials. Note: Material may have been edited for length and content. For more information, please contact the cited source.

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Five Indian foods to cure your intestinal problems https://gut-training.com/five-indian-foods-to-cure-your-intestinal-problems/ Wed, 08 Dec 2021 06:00:16 +0000 https://gut-training.com/five-indian-foods-to-cure-your-intestinal-problems/ Your gut health is linked to your overall health, which is why doctors always advise you to include gut-friendly foods in your diet. It can also help boost your immunity. While the occasional consumption of junk food like pizza and burgers is okay, it shouldn’t become a habit. According to Dr Rohini Patil, nutritionist and […]]]>

Your gut health is linked to your overall health, which is why doctors always advise you to include gut-friendly foods in your diet. It can also help boost your immunity. While the occasional consumption of junk food like pizza and burgers is okay, it shouldn’t become a habit.

According to Dr Rohini Patil, nutritionist and author of The lifestyle diet, it’s important to know how gut health affects your overall well-being.

“Give your gut the care and nourishment it needs. How do you know if your gut is healthy or unhealthy? There are signs that your gut health needs better nutrition and better care, ”she says.

* Fatigue, vomiting, constipation, gas or irregular bowel movements.
* Having an upset stomach, bloating.
* Unintentional weight loss or weight gain.
* Skin problems caused by poor diet.
* Lack of sleep or fatigue.

It is a known fact that foods of a probiotic nature are necessary for a healthy gut. “Probiotics not only help improve the gut, but also maintain it. Yogurt, kimchi, and miso are among the foods that are probiotic in nature. But, these foods are not readily available for everyone in India. Fortunately, Indian cuisine offers probiotic dishes that are easily accessible to everyone, ”explains Dr Patil.

1. Rasam: The ingredients found in rasam like dal, tamarind, herbs, and spices are packed with vitamins A, C, magnesium, iron, and calcium which are great for your digestive system. Rasam also contains fibers which facilitate intestinal transit and facilitate the evacuation of stool.

2. Kadhi: Besan kadhi, also known as kadhi, is full of magnesium and fiber which are essential for good gut health. It is also a home remedy for menstrual cramps, constipation, and weight loss.

3. Methi sabzi: Fenugreek is a must; it helps to lose weight, fight against constipation and other problems related to the intestines. The fiber in methi takes a long time to break down, which gives our gut enough time to absorb nutrients.

4. Karele ki sabzi: If cooked properly, karele ki sabzi is a delicious dish filled with fiber and nutrients that work like magic for constipation, indigestion. It is an excellent immunity booster.

5. Dhokla: You will have better bowel movements and your energy level will improve as well. Additionally, dhokla helps balance gut bacteria. The texture and taste of dhokla makes it easier to consume by the elderly and children.

On top of that, exercise, yoga, and staying hydrated can play an important role in gut health, the doctor concludes.

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Chewing gum after surgery may reduce bowel problems – Consumer Health News https://gut-training.com/chewing-gum-after-surgery-may-reduce-bowel-problems-consumer-health-news/ Tue, 21 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://gut-training.com/chewing-gum-after-surgery-may-reduce-bowel-problems-consumer-health-news/ TUESDAY, September 21, 2021 (HealthDay News) – Chewing gum after heart surgery may relieve postoperative bowel problems, according to a study presented at the annual Perioperative and Critical Care conference, hosted by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and held virtually from September 10 to 11. Sirivan Seng, MD, of Crozer-Chester Medical Center in Upland, Pa., […]]]>

TUESDAY, September 21, 2021 (HealthDay News) – Chewing gum after heart surgery may relieve postoperative bowel problems, according to a study presented at the annual Perioperative and Critical Care conference, hosted by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and held virtually from September 10 to 11.

Sirivan Seng, MD, of Crozer-Chester Medical Center in Upland, Pa., And colleagues asked 379 consecutive patients undergoing heart surgery from 2017 to 2020 to chew a piece of gum three times a day for five to 10 minutes once. deemed stable to participate. Postoperative ileus rates were compared between this cohort and 496 patients who underwent similar elective cardiac surgeries between 2013 and 2016.

The researchers found that in the chewing gum cohort, two patients (0.59%) had abdominal distension on physical examination and an x-ray confirmed postoperative ileus that required treatment compared to 17 patients (3.43%). in the 2013 to 2016 cohort. This difference in postoperative ileus was statistically significant. Chewing gum has not been associated with any complications.

“Before our study, there was no previously published study on the use of chewing gum in patients with heart surgery, but we found that it could speed up the return of bowel function,” said Seng in a statement. “Considering the minimal risk and extremely insignificant cost of this procedure, incorporating chewing gum after cardiac surgery should be strongly regarded as a new standard of care.”

Press release

More information

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7 ways to improve your gut health https://gut-training.com/7-ways-to-improve-your-gut-health/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://gut-training.com/7-ways-to-improve-your-gut-health/ When your gut feels good, you never think about it, but when it doesn’t, it’s hard to think of anything else. The group of microorganisms that live in and make up your gastrointestinal tract play a role in almost every aspect of your health, from preventing chronic disease to keeping your immune system functioning. So […]]]>

When your gut feels good, you never think about it, but when it doesn’t, it’s hard to think of anything else. The group of microorganisms that live in and make up your gastrointestinal tract play a role in almost every aspect of your health, from preventing chronic disease to keeping your immune system functioning. So it’s no wonder that when it’s out of whack you feel lousy.

But what is your instinct, exactly? And is it possible to improve your gut health? Here’s all you need to know.

What is the intestine?

The human gut is much more complex than even experts thought – it encompasses a wide range of internal organs involved in the digestion process to absorb nutrients from food and expel waste, says Rushabh Modi, MD, board-certified physician in both Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine at USC. “Typically this refers to the mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, and colon, with the pancreas and liver being essential as support organs that help make digestive enzymes. “he said.

How your gut keeps your body healthy

In addition to absorbing and transporting nutrients to all tissues in the body, the gut is vital for maintaining water and salt status and for expelling wastes, says Dr Modi. “Many vital nutrients and vitamins such as B12 and iron have specialized transporters that only exist in the gut as well,” he adds. Iron, for example, needs stomach acid to be absorbed effectively, and vitamin B12 also requires absorption of certain receptors in the stomach and midgut. “These nutrients are difficult to obtain by other means and they are essential for normal physiological functioning,” adds Dr Modi.

The intestine is also one of the main disease fighting systems in the body. “The acid in the stomach kills bacteria and viruses that can be accidentally consumed by the foods we eat, and the digestive tract is an important way to introduce antigens to strengthen immune function and protection in the body. “says Christine Lee, MD, a gastroenterologist at the Cleveland Clinic. “The digestive tract also digests the food consumed and extracts important nutrients to be taken into the body for essential use.”

Emerging research has even found a link between poor gut health and several neurological disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, autism and depression. A study from the University of Geneva found that people with Alzheimer’s disease have different types of bacteria that thrive in their gut than those without the disease.

8 signs your gut is in pain

If your gut is unhealthy, there’s a good chance you will experience one or more of the following symptoms, even mildly or rarely:

  1. Gas
  2. bloating
  3. Acid reflux
  4. Stomach pains
  5. Diarrhea
  6. Constipation
  7. Changes in stool
  8. Inexplicable weight loss
    1. “As the digestion of food and the production of waste are the two most vital functions of the gut, when patients have problems in these areas, the gut can often be the source of the problem,” says Dr Modi. Acid reflux and heartburn are also associated with the bowel, although you will feel the pain further from the core of the problem. Bloating is also becoming more and more common to the point that Dr Modi notes that patients see it almost as a normal reaction to the consumption of certain foods.

      If you are experiencing inexplicable weight loss despite eating regularly, it may be a sign that your body is not able to digest or absorb the nutrients from the foods you eat and that there is a problem with your body. digestive system, according to Dr. Lee.

      How to improve your gut health

      The good news is that there are some simple steps you can take to support your gut health. Here are some of the strategies that doctors recommend.

      Eat a wide range of healthy foods

      A diet made up of several different types of food can lead to a more diverse microbiome made up of more species, according to a review published in the journal Molecular metabolism. This, says Dr Lee, strengthens our microbiome and improves its resilience.

      The best foods for gut health are fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, seeds, and whole grains, especially those with the highest fiber content, which help your digestive tract to function properly. Women should aim for 25 grams of fiber per day and men should aim for 38 grams per day, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

      And cut back on unhealthy foods. “The more fat, fat, and salt you eat, the poorer your gut health will be,” says Scott David Lippe, MD, chief of gastroenterology at Bergen Regional Medical Center in Paramus, NJ, and assistant professor of clinical medicine at Rutgers Medical School. This is something to keep in mind, especially when going out to dinner, as restaurants tend to load up with salt, grease, and grease because they taste great.

      Try to cut out dairy products

      If you have gas, distension, or softer stools after drinking milk or eating cheese, you may be lactose intolerant. “It affects a significant number of adults, especially those who do not have Northern European ancestry,” says Dr Lippe. “A quick and easy test is to drink a glass of regular milk. If this makes you sick, then you are lactose intolerant. If you are not ready to cut out dairy products, you can also try taking lactose tablets before consuming foods containing dairy products.

      Consider a probiotic

      These tiny microorganisms help support your metabolism and rebalance your microbiota, says Douglas A. Drossman, MD, gastroenterologist and professor emeritus of medicine and psychiatry, UNC Division of Gastroenterology at UNC School of Medicine. He recommends taking them if you have symptoms of an unhealthy bowel; however, there may be no benefit otherwise. There isn’t actually a ton of research to support the gut benefits of probiotics.

      A review published in Therapeutic advances in gastroenterology, for example, found that probiotics positively impact the gut microbiota in people with certain illnesses, such as Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes, but did little to improve the gut microbiota in healthy people. “If you are taking antibiotics or have a diarrheal illness, taking probiotics can be very helpful,” adds Dr. Lippe. However, he recommends trying to get your fair share of foods rich in probiotics such as yogurt, sauerkraut, and kimchi first.

      Incorporate more prebiotics into your diet

      “Prebiotics are not bacteria, but rather types of food that good bacteria like to eat,” says Dr. Milstein. “We have to feed the good bacteria and starve the bad bacteria. »He recommends stocking up on foods containing good bacteria such as nuts, berries, bananas, flax seeds, legumes, artichokes, onions, garlic, chicory, dandelion leaves, asparagus, leeks and whole grains. “Nutrition is personalized, but putting fruits and vegetables and fiber on our plate at every meal helps gut health and therefore brain health,” adds Dr Milstein.

      Monitor your vitamin D levels

      Recent research plush in Nature Communication studied the link between gut bacteria and vitamin D levels and found that nutrient deficiencies play a key role in increasing the risk of certain diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, cardiovascular disease, and Cancer. Any form of disturbance of the gastrointestinal barrier is what is commonly referred to as “the leaky gut,” according to Dr. Drossman, which he believes can increase an individual’s risk of developing gastrointestinal illnesses. infectious, inflammatory and functional, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. “Most people with leaky gut have very low levels of vitamin D as well as very low levels of the two major omega 3s – EPA and DHA – in their bodies,” he says. He recommends that most people take at least 5,000 IU (125 mcg) of vitamin D3 per day and consume enough fish oil (or the vegan equivalent) of 1,000 mg of DHA per day. Be sure to talk to your doctor before taking any type of supplement.

      Manage your stress level

      Being stressed not only impacts your mental health, it also affects your physical well-being. Chronic high stress levels can have a direct impact on your gut health, says Dr. Drossman. While it may not always be possible to eliminate stressors in your life, adopting stress management strategies, such as diaphragmatic breathing, meditation or yoga, can help, says Drossman. . “It’s also a good idea to consider consulting with a mental health care provider to determine if brain therapies (cognitive behavioral treatment, hypnosis, mindfulness) can be used,” he adds.

      Get enough sleep every night

      When you don’t get enough sleep your whole body is affected, including your gut. In fact, new research shows just how interconnected your gut microbiome and the quality of your sleep are. A study from Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Florida found that poor sleep can negatively impact your gut microbiome for reasons as yet unknown, which can then manifest itself in a host of other health issues. such as autoimmune diseases and mental disorders. . The National Sleep Foundation recommends that adults get between 7 and 9 hours of sleep per night.

      This content is created and maintained by a third party, and uploaded to this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and other similar content on piano.io

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    Chewing Gum After Heart Surgery May Help Relieve Bowel Problems https://gut-training.com/chewing-gum-after-heart-surgery-may-help-relieve-bowel-problems/ Thu, 09 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://gut-training.com/chewing-gum-after-heart-surgery-may-help-relieve-bowel-problems/ Newswise – CHICAGO (September 10, 2021) – Chewing gum after heart surgery can jump-start the digestive tract, helping patients feel better and potentially come out sooner than those who don’t use this generally safe and simple procedure, according to research presented today at the 18th Annual Society of Thoracic Surgeons Perioperative and Critical Care Conference. […]]]>

    Newswise – CHICAGO (September 10, 2021) – Chewing gum after heart surgery can jump-start the digestive tract, helping patients feel better and potentially come out sooner than those who don’t use this generally safe and simple procedure, according to research presented today at the 18th Annual Society of Thoracic Surgeons Perioperative and Critical Care Conference.

    “Before our study, there was no previously published study on the use of chewing gum in patients with heart surgery, but we found that it can speed up the return of bowel function,” said Sirivan S. Seng, MD, who is a resident physician at Crozer-Chester Medical Center in Upland, Pennsylvania. “This easy-to-perform procedure can be used with almost any postoperative patient.”

    Dr Seng and his colleagues studied patients at Crozer-Chester Medical Center who underwent elective open heart surgery, aortic valve replacement, or mitral valve repair / replacement. One group included 341 patients who underwent surgery from 2017 to 2020 and participated in the sugar-free chewing gum protocol after their operations. A second group, which included 496 patients, underwent similar heart surgeries between 2013 and 2016, but did not chew a gum after their procedures.

    Research found that only two of the patients chewing gums (0.59%) had confirmed postoperative ileus, while 17 patients in the non-chewing gum group (3.43%) developed postoperative ileus, that is. that is, a lack of normal muscle contractions in the intestines which leads to a build-up and potential blockage of food material.

    This brief stoppage of the digestive system is among the most common complications after heart surgery, occurring in up to 5.5% of patients, explained Dr Seng. Although not a major health problem, ileus can cause abdominal cramps, bloating, nausea, vomiting, constipation, and difficulty tolerating a normal diet. As a result, patients may experience discomfort, slow recovery, and longer hospital stays, which in turn leads to increased physical, emotional and financial strain on patients.

    “An underestimated concern after heart surgery is the development of an ileus or a slow return of bowel function,” said Rakesh C. Arora, MD, PhD, St. Boniface Hospital in Winnipeg, MB, Canada, which was not directly involved in this research. “The idea that something as simple as chewing gum after heart surgery could minimize this problem is very appealing. In hundreds of heart surgery patients who received a piece of chewing gum after recovering from the ventilator, less than 1 in 100 patients developed ileus. This is a striking reduction of almost 5 times from the historical average. This eagerly awaited study will be hotly debated with plenty to chew on! “

    Chewing gum is believed to stimulate the intestines into believing that food is coming. This is known as “sham eating,” which is a procedure that mimics normal food consumption, but where food and drink are not actually digested or absorbed.

    According to the researchers, postoperative chewing of the gum is an effective and inexpensive procedure that helps improve the feeling of patients after surgery. When patients feel better, they are more likely to participate in their own recovery and, ultimately, to be released more quickly.

    “Given the minimal risk and extremely insignificant cost of this procedure, incorporating chewing gum after cardiac surgery should be strongly regarded as a new standard of care,” said Dr Seng. “Talk to your surgeon about using chewing gum after surgery. Almost anyone can benefit from an affordable, tasty and refreshing pack of chewing gum.

    ###

    The other study authors were H. Orbay, MD, PhD, and C. Geller, MD.

    Founded in 1964, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons is a non-profit organization representing more than 7,500 cardiothoracic surgeons, researchers and allied health professionals around the world who are dedicated to ensuring the best possible results for surgeries of the heart, lungs and l esophagus, as well as other surgeries in the chest. The Company’s mission is to advance the delivery of the highest quality patient care by cardiothoracic surgeons through collaboration, education, research and advocacy.

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    Doctors warn of intestinal problems during the monsoon; here’s what to keep in mind https://gut-training.com/doctors-warn-of-intestinal-problems-during-the-monsoon-heres-what-to-keep-in-mind/ Mon, 02 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://gut-training.com/doctors-warn-of-intestinal-problems-during-the-monsoon-heres-what-to-keep-in-mind/ The monsoon is pleasant. But it also brings a host of illnesses, infections and allergies. The digestive system is particularly vulnerable during the rainy season and gastric problems such as acidity, bloating, indigestion, gastroenteritis, ulcers and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) become common. Hence, it is the urge of the hour to stick to a well-balanced […]]]>

    The monsoon is pleasant. But it also brings a host of illnesses, infections and allergies. The digestive system is particularly vulnerable during the rainy season and gastric problems such as acidity, bloating, indigestion, gastroenteritis, ulcers and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) become common. Hence, it is the urge of the hour to stick to a well-balanced diet, exercise daily, avoid junk food, spicy and fatty foods, and drink water. porridge, say doctors.

    “We have always seen an influx of patients with infections of the stomach, intestines and liver during the rainy season. The number of patients suddenly increased due to infections through food and water, ”said Dr Keyur Sheth, gastroenterologist, Apollo Spectra Hospital, Mumbai.

    Dr Sheth mentioned that globally, infectious gastrointestinal diseases and dehydration remain the leading causes of death, responsible for around 450,000 deaths per year. More than 1,000 patients come to the hospital each month for treatment of stomach problems. Eating heavy foods can slow down the digestion process and lead to problems such as bloat, gas, acidity and indigestion. Having to chatter or street juice can cause stomach infection because the water used to make it can contain bacteria. Drinking water from sources other than sealed bottles and water purifiers can also make you sick and you could get diarrhea, Dr Sheth said.

    What happens?

    Wet weather during the rainy season makes the whole digestive system slow. Consuming food contaminated with bacteria, toxins and parasites is unpleasant for the digestive system. “This can lead to gastroenteritis, which is an infection of the intestine also known as food poisoning or belly bug. Many patients complain of vomiting, nausea, gas, chronic constipation, ulcerative colitis, gastritis and problems with intestinal sensitivity. Gastrointestinal problems are considerably high. Almost, we see about 15 patients every day with irregular sleep and diet, “said Dr Roy Patankar, Director and Gastroenterologist, Zen Multispeciality Hospital.

    What to do?

    “Avoid carbonated drinks because they reduce enzyme activity and lead to mineral loss by weakening the digestive system. Say no to dairy products like milk because they take a long time to digest and are heavy on the intestines, ”said Dr Sheth.

    Here are some essential tips for keeping the digestive system functioning properly during monsoon.

    * Avoid eating seafood as the water is contaminated during monsoon and eating fish can cause cholera or diarrhea.
    * Do not eat fruit cut by the roadside as it may be contaminated with bacteria.
    * Avoid green leafy vegetables as they will be loaded with germs, eat in moderation, opt for lighter, gut-friendly and easy-to-digest foods.
    * “Include ginger and lemon in the diet to improve digestion and immunity,” said Dr Sheth.
    * Eat lots of probiotics like yogurt or buttermilk because they contain good bacteria that work on our digestive system and support the immune system.
    * Drink enough water to flush toxins from the body and improve digestion.
    * Eat steamed or boiled vegetables instead of raw, as these will be packed with bacteria and viruses, making your gut worse.
    * Do not eat refined sugar as it can cause inflammation and upset the balance of the intestinal flora.
    * Say no to fried and fatty foods that cause acidity and bloating.
    * Do not lie down immediately after eating, as you may suffer from acidity.
    * “Too much stress is bad for your digestive system, so stay stress free and exercise at home every day,” said Dr Patankar.

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    Professor Green: Solving my bowel problems has done wonders for my mental health https://gut-training.com/professor-green-solving-my-bowel-problems-has-done-wonders-for-my-mental-health/ Thu, 03 Dec 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://gut-training.com/professor-green-solving-my-bowel-problems-has-done-wonders-for-my-mental-health/ PROFESSOR Green is so articulate and informed that you might think that the title of “Professor” was a true academic qualification, rather than just a stage name (his real name is Stephen Manderson). The rapper and musician actually left school without a degree, but he’s certainly familiar with life and health experiences. Green – who […]]]>

    PROFESSOR Green is so articulate and informed that you might think that the title of “Professor” was a true academic qualification, rather than just a stage name (his real name is Stephen Manderson). The rapper and musician actually left school without a degree, but he’s certainly familiar with life and health experiences.

    Green – who just turned 37 and has sold over three million records – was raised by his grandmother and extended family on an estate in the East London Council. He spoke openly about the health issues he endured, including stomach issues, anxiety and depression.

    He’s now in great shape, he says, which he attributes in large part to making the connection between his gut and his brain. And after years of trying various supplement combinations, he’s now created his own “companion formula” called Aguulp (aguulp.com), designed to support brain, gut, and immunity wellness.

    Here, Green, who is also a patron of the male suicide prevention charity Calm (thecalmzone.net), tells us more …

    :: What health problems have you had?

    “I had IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) diagnosed at a very young age. It’s weird with IBS, all the research I’ve done suggests it can be a precursor to psychological disorders like anxiety and depression, but it can also be preceded by some really stressful life events – it’s a bit of a chicken-and-egg situation.

    “Much later, in 2017, I had a hiatus hernia. I tried to avoid having surgery and they made me take the highest dose of pretty horrible pills. I was only supposed to be on them for a month, but I was on them for two years. It was not a very pleasant time.

    :: You finally opted for surgery – what happened?

    “When I had the operation I was back home in 48 hours, but in less than 24 hours I was back in the hospital. I looked like I was pregnant with triplets, it was pretty scary. I had an ileus [when muscle or nerve problems stop things moving through the gut], pneumonia, and a partially collapsed lung, and my readings suggested I should have been dead.

    “Two weeks later, after they drained just over four liters of inflammatory fluid, I was sent home with a nearly paralyzed stomach. I wasn’t getting any nutrients. It was pretty awful.

    “The options were gastric bypass surgery, or wait and hope. But if I had had surgery and had the same complications again, I could have died. It was a terrible place. I decided not to operate.

    :: How did you deal with your stomach problems after this?

    “I started to learn about gut health and the link between gut health and mental health, which surprised me quite a bit. I’ve been a mental health advocate for years – it’s something that means a lot to me, especially with what I’ve been through and what happened with my dad [Green’s father died by suicide].

    “I started using supplements, which was an incredibly confusing process. I wasn’t sure what was working and what was not, but I was trying to do whatever I could to improve my health. Gradually things started to improve, and I was quite shocked to find that the better I took care of myself and my gut, the better my head felt and the more my mental health improved. This continues to this day.

    :: Then you created Aguulp – what was your goal there?

    “If I had put my name on an alcohol brand, people would have understood that, but it would be quite irresponsible of me to put my name on an alcohol brand. I think people find it quite confusing that I put a product on the market that might have some health benefits! I wouldn’t want to relive what I’ve been through twice, and I think it’s important to pass on what I’ve learned on this trip.

    “If I feel better, it makes it easier to make good decisions. I’m more likely to exercise, and if I exercise I’m more likely to eat better, if I eat better I’m more likely to sleep better – it just creates a positive cycle.

    :: How is your gut health now?

    “My guts are really good. Touch wood, I don’t suffer much from the issues that I have had on and off throughout my life. I feel a bit more resilient and a lot more robust.

    “Things seem more cohesive. Being consistent allows us to live a more linear life. Everyone longs for happiness but, if anything, the constant should just be [to feel] content. And I feel pretty happy.

    :: How was your journey with mental health?

    “I had bouts of depression and took medication when I was in a better place than I had been in a long time. I had always rejected medications – I guess I felt a bit taboo – but I tried them and they weren’t for me. I find life choices to be the most important thing to me. If I take care of myself and make the right decisions, then I tend to stay pretty well. That doesn’t mean I don’t have a bad day – everyone gets a bad day every now and then.

    :: What is your approach to having a healthy lifestyle now?

    “There is a balance. I’m not afraid of a glass of red wine, and I still like to indulge myself sometimes with food. I would be lying if I said you would never find me in a chicken store at 3 a.m. – not right now because they’re all closed – but I’ve tried to cut down on the amount of meat I eat.

    “I love salt and vinegar crisps, I don’t think that will ever change. But when I’m in a good position, I tend to be pretty healthy.

    “I think education is the key and prevention is better than cure. I’m starting to have gray hair so I’m clearly aging. You start to want to take better care of yourself.

    :: How did you experience the confinement?

    “The same as everyone else – some people are obviously more comfortable and secure than others. I don’t like that I haven’t been able to hug my grandma since January.

    “I try to spend as much time as possible outdoors. I have two really big dogs so I have enough reasons to be there – but even though I didn’t have the days when I feel the most bad, when I get up and go out. , I always feel better.

    :: What is your exercise routine?

    “I did my back about 10 weeks ago, so walking was the only exercise I did, but I just got back to it. I use a spinning bike and do some weight training – not as much as I would like but I don’t put too much pressure on myself. I loved going to the gym – I’m not a gym fan, it’s more about endorphins and how that makes me feel.

    “The most important thing is just to get through it healthily, with my sanity. If you can find within yourself to sit down and focus on something then do it, but I don’t think giving yourself extra pressure during this time is very smart. There is already enough pressure on us.

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