Gut treatment – Gut Training http://gut-training.com/ Fri, 19 Aug 2022 09:57:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gut-training.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png Gut treatment – Gut Training http://gut-training.com/ 32 32 Jalore manager’s father says ‘paying Dalit family for treatment’ backfired https://gut-training.com/jalore-managers-father-says-paying-dalit-family-for-treatment-backfired/ Fri, 19 Aug 2022 02:00:48 +0000 https://gut-training.com/jalore-managers-father-says-paying-dalit-family-for-treatment-backfired/ I love: Far from the gaze of the media, police personnel and political attention enjoyed by the village of Surana in the district of Jalore in Rajasthan, Suki Kanwar is in shock. She is the wife of Chail Singh, 40, the headmaster of the ‘upper caste’ school charged in the death of a 9-year-old Dalit […]]]>

I love: Far from the gaze of the media, police personnel and political attention enjoyed by the village of Surana in the district of Jalore in Rajasthan, Suki Kanwar is in shock.

She is the wife of Chail Singh, 40, the headmaster of the ‘upper caste’ school charged in the death of a 9-year-old Dalit boy, Inder Meghwal, from Jalore. Since her arrest, she has been suffering from what appear to be epileptic seizures.

“Tension mein usko mata aati rehti hai (she suffers from stress-induced seizures),” Chail Singh’s cousin Mangal Singh said as Suki suddenly passed out in the middle of a conversation with ThePrint.

It’s been almost a week since Singh’s arrest.

The principal is accused of fatally beating Inder for drinking in a matka (clay pot) was meant for him, and the boy’s family alleged a caste motive for the incident.

The incident – of Singh punching Inder – reportedly happened on July 20 at Saraswati Vidya Mandir, a private school in Surana. The boy died on August 13 while receiving intensive medical treatment in Ahmedabad.

Chail Singh was arrested the same day for murder, as well as under sections of the Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes (Prevention of Atrocities) Act 1989. The police investigation is ongoing.

However, the caste angle has been questioned in light of statements made by local residents.

Questions have also been raised about the cause of the boy’s death, in light of findings that Inder Meghwal had been undergoing treatment for a middle ear infection for several years which caused a painful abscess to form. behind the eye, blockages in the brain and eventually triggered sepsis in the days leading up to his death.

Singh’s family also deny the caste angle, saying the principal “made a mistake in paying money to Meghwals for Inder’s treatment”.

The Meghwal family previously told ThePrint that Chail Singh paid them Rs 1.5 lakh as a ‘settlement’.

Denying the allegation, Chail Singh’s father, Ushk Singh, 70, said: “Usne paise dekar galti kar di (he made a mistake giving them money).

“The transaction is now called ‘hush money’. It was nothing like that. He was worried that he had accidentally hurt the child,” he added.

None of the family members know how Singh managed to give such a large sum to the Meghwals. “He had to give it out of school funds,” Ushk Singh added.

Singh also owns farmland with his three brothers and is involved in agriculture.

Kheta Ram Bhil, an indentured laborer who has been working on Chail Singh’s land for almost five years, was present at the Singh’s house during ThePrint’s visit.

Bhil said he had never been discriminated against by Chail Singh. “He ate with me and invited me to his house. We drank water together in the fields,” he added.

Chail Singh’s sons – Laxman, 14, and Gopal, 10 – who are also students at Saraswati Vidya Mandir, also told ThePrint that everyone in the school drinks from the same water tank.

Chail Singh’s sons, Laxman (14) and Gopal (10) | Credit: Praveen Jain | The footprint

Chail Singh is currently housed at Sayla Police Station. According to senior sources in the district administration, the police are still awaiting the results of the histopathological analysis of the autopsy report to understand the cause of Inder’s death.


Read also : Violence goes viral – Dalits in Rajasthan have a new tool against atrocities, their phones


sick parents

Singh’s family lives in a dilapidated house located more than 50 kilometers from Surana. Ideally, the journey should take no more than two hours, but navigating around waterlogged potholes and roaming livestock on narrow, rugged roads lined with thorny shrubbery can take up to five hours.

To get to Surana, Singh had to walk about six to seven kilometers to catch a bus. To avoid the hassle of daily commuting, Singh and his two sons lived on the school premises.

“He came home once every two weeks. The day of his arrest, he was returning home with his children. He was arrested halfway and we had no information about it,” Mangal Singh said.

With their main breadwinner under arrest, the family doesn’t know what to expect in the coming days. Chail Singh was earning a monthly salary of around Rs 10,000 to Rs 15,000, they said.

Uskh Singh (70), father of Chail Singh |  Credit: Praveen Jain |  The footprint
Uskh Singh (70), father of Chail Singh | Credit: Praveen Jain | The footprint

The family was building another authentic premises in their compound after the existing structure was damaged by rain, but with Chail Singh under arrest, construction came to a halt.

His mother, Dariya Kanwar, 60, is currently undergoing tests for suspected colon cancer, while Ushk Singh is being treated for stomach ulcers, added Mangal Singh, who claimed to be undergoing treatment for heart problems. Mental Health.

“No one has come to meet us yet,” he said. “Not the police, not the media.”

(Editing by Zinnia Ray Chaudhuri)


Read also : The dominant castes cannot digest the progress of the Dalits. That’s why they attack the reserve with propaganda


]]>
Treatment approaches for myelofibrosis after disease progression https://gut-training.com/treatment-approaches-for-myelofibrosis-after-disease-progression/ Thu, 18 Aug 2022 15:52:17 +0000 https://gut-training.com/treatment-approaches-for-myelofibrosis-after-disease-progression/ Rami Komrokji, MD: This patient received ruxolitinib 10 mg twice daily for about a month, but had to reduce the dose to 5 mg twice daily. He then presented with profound anemia, a hemoglobin of 6.8 g/dL and his platelets were 45,000 per μL. He still has constitutional symptoms and splenomegaly. What would you do […]]]>

Rami Komrokji, MD: This patient received ruxolitinib 10 mg twice daily for about a month, but had to reduce the dose to 5 mg twice daily. He then presented with profound anemia, a hemoglobin of 6.8 g/dL and his platelets were 45,000 per μL. He still has constitutional symptoms and splenomegaly. What would you do at this point?

Jamile Shammo, MD, FACP, FACP: It’s so surprising to me. Obviously you’re concerned about the progression, but I’m also wondering what happened after you reduced them in dose. How often was it monitored? That’s what I was trying to say about when people are monitored periodically. What happened between 10mg and 5mg, and how often [was he monitored]? You have to decide if this is iatrogenic or disease progression. The rate of cytopenia relative to dose reduction should be assessed. Then with the stomach pain you begin to wonder if there was an initial spleen response and now a resurgence of the spleen. This too must be taken into account.

Obviously, if practitioners determine this is consistent with disease progression, you need to switch. Obviously, you are looking at that platelet count and you should opt for an agent that would allow you to start treatment with a platelet count below 50,000 per μL. There is only one agent you can use with a platelet count below 50,000 per μL: pacritinib. The crucial question in this case is whether it is agent-induced cytopenias – which would be surprising – vs disease progression.

Ruben Mesa, MD: Although determining one or the other is important as it has implications in terms of transplantation. Have they really progressed? But either way, pacritinib would still be an option. It has a few niches. In people who are too sensitive to the alternative, ruxolitinib or fedratinib, and who have cytopenias and thrombocytopenias, pacritinib is ideal. Or they were resistant or had progression in both cases. But you are right: it is essential to determine the reason and to ensure that the reason is related to the disease. Thrombocytopenia less, but as a caveat I found several secondary colon cancers, GYN [gynecological] cancers and other reasons why people became anemic when they had myelofibrosis, due to a different cause. Always wear your hematologist and internist hat. Not all anemias result from myelofibrosis.

Jamile Shammo, MD, FACP, FACP: Ruben, would you make a marrowbone? We’re probably all in agreement that you should assess stomach pain and do an ultrasound, but what about an assessment?

Ruben Mesa, MD: The timing is very important, the dynamics. If it’s relatively soon after onset and the bone marrow has been within the last 6 months, it’s probably more the drug. But the more time passes, the more I am aware that time is a critical variable in disease, and I have a relatively low threshold to repeat bone marrow, particularly if something has changed. Diseases are not linear. We were all surprised by the patient who seems stable but we get the call from the lab and they say, “Do you know Mrs. Jones has 30% blasts in her peripheral blood?” A month ago, his accounts were good and there were no outbursts.

Jamile Shammo, MD, FACP, FACP: In effect.

Ruben Mesa, MD: They are not linear. I agree; having a low threshold to repeat a bone marrow is important.

]]>
Ontario family seeks answers and treatment for rare childhood genetic condition https://gut-training.com/ontario-family-seeks-answers-and-treatment-for-rare-childhood-genetic-condition/ Tue, 16 Aug 2022 21:29:17 +0000 https://gut-training.com/ontario-family-seeks-answers-and-treatment-for-rare-childhood-genetic-condition/ In less than a year, the parents of an Ontario toddler said they saw their daughter lose all her fine and gross motor skills and could no longer walk or sit up. “His (fourth) birthday is in October. We don’t know what will happen then,” said Jonelle, Avery Vlogiannitis’ mother. In 2021, after numerous doctor’s […]]]>

In less than a year, the parents of an Ontario toddler said they saw their daughter lose all her fine and gross motor skills and could no longer walk or sit up.

“His (fourth) birthday is in October. We don’t know what will happen then,” said Jonelle, Avery Vlogiannitis’ mother.

In 2021, after numerous doctor’s appointments, therapist appointments, MRIs, blood work and genetic testing, Avery was diagnosed with spinocerebellar ataxia type 28, or SCA28, a rare neurodegenerative genetic disorder. .

“Her genetic specialist at SickKids explained it to me and said ‘it’s very slowly degenerative…you might not even see a change in Avery for quite a long time’ and in everyone she knows. , it will only start in adulthood,” Jonelle recalls.

Avery turned out to be the exception.

The story continues under the ad

Read more:

‘Uncharted Territory’: Toronto family of child with rare disease raise $3 million for therapy

“I noticed that she had trouble grasping the toys, she couldn’t hold them for long, sometimes she would fall. I thought she was just silly the first few times it happened because she’s always laughing and has a smile on her face and then from there it just became that she couldn’t get up and go brush teeth, couldn’t hold the toothbrush,” Jonelle said.

In just a few months, many of Avery’s life skills disappeared.

“His neurologist at SickKids and the pediatrician told us it was the start of his illness. They couldn’t believe it started when they were two years old… unfortunately over the next two months it went away very quickly,” she said.

SCA28 is a degenerative disease for which there is no cure.

Read more:

‘No cure’: Toronto family of toddler struggling with new rare disease raises money for research

Avery’s latest challenge has been to eat. In April, she underwent surgery to insert a feeding tube that leads directly into her stomach. She is strictly on toddler formula and her parents have been told this will continue for the rest of her life.

The story continues under the ad

Avery’s parents said they struggled with the unknown.

His doctors said to us, “I know you keep asking, what’s the next step? “…And they all said, ‘you have to be prepared that your time with Avery is very limited’ and they said that, unfortunately, his lungs will probably affect him next, and then his heart,” Jonelle cried.

The family launched a GoFundMe campaign, Fight for Avery Vlogiannitis, hoping to raise $250,000 for medical equipment not covered by government funding or private insurance and a home nurse, the costs associated with the encounter with physicians outside of Canada and the search for possible treatments. , such as gene therapy.

“Some pharmaceutical companies have told me it could take five to ten years and some people have had gene therapy in three years. So we’re just going to play day to day, deal with it day to day…if there’s has a pharmaceutical company that wants to do this and try to save his life, that’s all we can try to do,” said Avery’s father Tony Vlogiannitis.

Read more:

‘A deck of cards no one should get’: Ontario brothers and sisters battle rare disease and hope for a cure

Researchers suggest that gene therapy can replace faulty or missing genes with the goal of curing disease or improving your body’s ability to fight disease.

The story continues under the ad

In the meantime, the family hopes sharing their story will shed light on what’s next.

“I just hope someone has experience with this or can just provide some insight, whether it’s medicine or gene therapy,” Jonelle said.

“Maybe there’s someone who has a doctor who’s treated this who could just shed some light on that so the unknown as to what’s going to happen next week or next month isn’t going to just punch us in the face all of a sudden.”

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

]]>
Melanoma and colorectal cancer grateful for treatment at MD Anderson | MD Anderson Cancer Center https://gut-training.com/melanoma-and-colorectal-cancer-grateful-for-treatment-at-md-anderson-md-anderson-cancer-center/ Mon, 15 Aug 2022 13:50:29 +0000 https://gut-training.com/melanoma-and-colorectal-cancer-grateful-for-treatment-at-md-anderson-md-anderson-cancer-center/ Unless I’m a patient or know a friend or relative who has it, I can’t imagine most people think too much about cancer, let alone where they would go if they caught it. Why would you, if it wasn’t absolutely necessary? Before March 2015, I had never been sick a single day in my life, […]]]>

Unless I’m a patient or know a friend or relative who has it, I can’t imagine most people think too much about cancer, let alone where they would go if they caught it. Why would you, if it wasn’t absolutely necessary? Before March 2015, I had never been sick a single day in my life, so I had no reason to think about cancer either.

But when I was diagnosed with colorectal cancer and then superficial spreading melanoma later that year, I was so glad to be at MD Anderson. The expertise of its doctors is worth the detour.

My Colorectal Cancer Diagnosis

I live in a small town in Arkansas. So when the blood that I had been seeing in my stool on and off for about a year started getting worse, my local doctor sent me to a gastroenterologist in Memphis, Tennessee. It’s the closest big city to me, and it only takes about an hour and a half to get there.

The Memphis doctor performed a colonoscopy and removed tissue for a biopsy. When the results came back he told me I had stage I rectal cancer.

The tumor was only the size of a large marble and was located in the lower part of my rectum, but the Memphis doctor said surgical removal of the growth was the best and only treatment option he had. could give me. I was also told that I would need a permanent colostomy – or a bag that collects stool outside the body through a hole in the abdomen – in order to remove the tumor.

My colorectal cancer treatment

My daughter and I didn’t like that sound very much. So she pulled out her phone and started researching the best places to go for colorectal cancer treatment. MD Anderson is ranked #1 in the nation for cancer care. We called and made an appointment.

To MD Anderson, I first met colorectal cancer surgeon Dr. Miguel Rodriguez-Bigas. He did additional tests and scans to confirm my diagnosis. He agreed that I should have the tumor removed. But since we caught him early, he said I would only need a temporary stoma. He was able to reverse it about three months later after my body had a chance to heal.

This plan looks much better to me. So Dr. Rodriguez-Bigas removed the tumor, part of my colon, and all of my rectum in the operation on April 19, 2015. He removed all the cancer, so I didn’t need chemotherapy, radiotherapy or any other treatment.

My unexpected diagnosis of melanoma

At that time, I thought I was done with cancer. Unfortunately, the cancer was not done with me. Before my stoma was reversed on July 22, 2015, my wife noticed a small pink spot on my back. She told me I had to have it checked out.

We made an appointment with MD Anderson dermatologist Dr Kelly Nelson for the same day I removed my staples. Dr. Nelson examined him and took tissue for a biopsy. A week later she called me to tell me the results: I had stage I melanoma. I needed to come back and get treatment.

I still didn’t feel very well at the time, and had only been home from the hospital for a week. But I’m glad to be back there: Dr. Nelson was able to remove the melanoma in his office, and that’s it. As we also caught this cancer early, I did not need any further treatment.

Why do I feel blessed by MD Anderson skill

I have been cancer free since 2015. I only go back to MD Anderson now for my annual exams. And every time I see Dr. Nelson or Dr. Rodriguez-Bigas, I remember how blessed I am to be at MD Anderson.

Dr. Nelson has an eye for spotting skin cancer that no one else has. Whenever she has medical students following her, she waits outside the exam room and lets them do my head-to-toe skin exam first. Then she returns to perform the skin examination herself. And she always finds things that need to be dealt with.

After Dr. Rodriguez-Bigas reversed my stoma, my daughter took copies of my abdominal scans to the doctor in Memphis to show him what I had done. He was really happy for me, but admitted he couldn’t have done the same. So I know I made the right decision choosing MD Anderson.

My life today, after treatment for melanoma and colorectal cancer

Today I am doing very well. But Dr. Rodriguez-Bigas removed my rectum and part of my colon before putting me back together. So it took me a while to get used to the changes.

I think the sickest I have ever felt was right after he reversed the stoma. My gut was starting to cramp and spasm. I had to go to the bathroom sometimes 10 or 15 times a day. It was really hard for me. Finally, he prescribed me a drug called dicyclomine used to treat irritable bowel syndrome. I take a pill twice a day now. It helps a lot.

I still have days when I can’t really leave the house. But they don’t happen as often as they used to – usually if I try to do too much. If I stay up too long, I know I’ll pay for it. But I’m retired now, and I’ve learned to slow down and pace myself. So I get along very well.

Request an appointment at MD Anderson on line or by calling 1-877-632-6789.

]]>
Heat intolerance: what are the symptoms, causes and treatment? https://gut-training.com/heat-intolerance-what-are-the-symptoms-causes-and-treatment/ Sun, 14 Aug 2022 15:00:57 +0000 https://gut-training.com/heat-intolerance-what-are-the-symptoms-causes-and-treatment/ Heat intolerance is a condition in which the body cannot properly regulate its internal temperature. This can lead to a higher risk of developing heatstroke, which can be life-threatening. Certain conditions are known to lower your heat tolerance and make you more susceptible to overheating, so people with these conditions should be extra careful in […]]]>

Heat intolerance is a condition in which the body cannot properly regulate its internal temperature. This can lead to a higher risk of developing heatstroke, which can be life-threatening. Certain conditions are known to lower your heat tolerance and make you more susceptible to overheating, so people with these conditions should be extra careful in the summer or in hot environments.

We spoke to heat intolerance medical experts to get their perspective on the causes, symptoms and possible treatments, as well as their top tips for those with underlying conditions that could put them at risk. a higher risk. If you’re worried about getting hot and being bothered, we’ve also compiled a list of ways to stay cool in the heat.

What is heat intolerance?

]]>
Yoga as a treatment for back pain | Lifestyles https://gut-training.com/yoga-as-a-treatment-for-back-pain-lifestyles/ Fri, 12 Aug 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://gut-training.com/yoga-as-a-treatment-for-back-pain-lifestyles/ Here is a personal example of how yoga transformed my daily life from living in excruciating pain to a manageable existence. While I was a student in India, a yoga master trained me for five years. However, when I came to the United States to pursue my higher education, I was sporadic in my yoga […]]]>

Here is a personal example of how yoga transformed my daily life from living in excruciating pain to a manageable existence.

While I was a student in India, a yoga master trained me for five years. However, when I came to the United States to pursue my higher education, I was sporadic in my yoga practice. Almost 40 years ago, while I was renovating the attic, an incident occurred. It opened my eyes to the art of yoga.

I was in excellent health. While fixing the attic, I carried 32 sheets of drywall up to the third floor via two narrow staircases. As a daredevil, I figured I didn’t need anyone’s help to carry those sheets up to the attic.

In July, the temperature in the attic was 105 degrees. As I individually struggled to twist each leaf through these narrow passages, I also twisted my lower back. After wearing 31 sheets, I was totally exhausted. Although my body was complaining, my mind was telling me to wear the last one to finish the job. As I was not listening to my body, when I was in the middle of the second staircase I heard a crackling. It sent excruciating pangs of pain down my back. I felt my body above the hips was collapsing.

A bloodcurdling scream of pain erupted from my body. My wife came to my rescue. She lifted the plasterboard and laid it flat. The pain was so intense that I felt like I was going to pass out. My wife brought me a glass of water. I took a few sips to stay conscious.

As I lay there, I thought about the yoga exercises taught by my teacher ten years ago. I remember him saying that lower back pain was due to bad posture or bad lifting habits. The sound of his voice echoed in my ears. He said: “To regularize the situation, maintain your lumbar lordosis, the curve formed by the hips and the rib cage!

There I was, flat on the ground in great pain. I needed to do something to relieve this discomfort. I tried to gently press my hips and shoulders to form the arch of lumbar lordosis. Although it was horribly painful, it eased the pressure on my back. I held this arch for a count of ten, then released the tension by gently pushing my lower back against the carpeted floor. Immediately I felt relief from the tenderness caused by the twisting and turning of the tendons in my lower back. I repeated this exercise five more times. To my surprise, I could stand up without pain.

The next day I saw a doctor. He took X-rays and found that one of these five vertebrae that make up the lumbar region of my spine had cracked during my childhood. Since no one treated it then, it repaired itself. However, he was not aligned. Every time I lifted something, the stress on those vertebrae could cause the excruciating pain I had suffered the night before. Since my heaving of slabs of rock had made him tender, he would act throughout my life. It meant I had to live with chronic back pain.

The doctor prescribed ibuprofen as a pain reliever. I have also tried alternative chiropractic, acupuncture and acupressure therapies. After trying these treatments for a few months, I was disappointed. Then I started doing the yoga exercises for lumbar lordosis as directed by my yoga teacher. These exercises went directly to the sore spot where the disease lay. I have been practicing these yoga exercises for 40 years. They have made my lower back so functional that I continue to play tennis with players of different ages. Doing yoga exercises regularly has done wonders for me to lead a healthy and productive life!

Warning: The exercise below is only a suggestion. If you try it regularly, it might ease the tension!

Stand on your back. Let your arms rest next to your body. Inhale and exhale. Observe the flow of your breath. He should feel good. Now become aware of your hips and shoulder blades. Press them against the floor while lifting your lower back. Maintain the lumbar lordotic curve of the lower back. Stay in this position for a count of ten and then relax. Inhale and exhale. Observe the flow of your breath. He should feel good. Repeat this exercise five times. Then relax your lower back. Inhale and exhale. Observe the flow of your breath. He should feel good. For best results, do this exercise on an empty stomach!

Dr. Ashok Kumar Malhotra has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. He is a SUNY Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus and founder of the Yoga and Meditation Society at SUNY Oneonta. His videos are available on YouTube. Malhotra’s columns are condensed from his eBooks available at https://www.amazon.com/author/malhotra. He donates all royalties to the Ninash Foundation (www.ninash.org), a charity that builds schools for disadvantaged girls and minority children in India.

]]>
Personalized treatment to optimize fiber intake https://gut-training.com/personalized-treatment-to-optimize-fiber-intake/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 18:11:04 +0000 https://gut-training.com/personalized-treatment-to-optimize-fiber-intake/ This so-called targeted approach should take into account dietary history and metabolite levels”as informative and non-invasive biomarkers of treatment outcomethey say. A study looking at the response of gut microbes to fiber intake found the greatest response in participants with the lowest fiber intake at baseline, but observed an opposite effect in those with a […]]]>

This so-called targeted approach should take into account dietary history and metabolite levels”as informative and non-invasive biomarkers of treatment outcomethey say.

A study looking at the response of gut microbes to fiber intake found the greatest response in participants with the lowest fiber intake at baseline, but observed an opposite effect in those with a high usual fiber intake.

This demonstrates the association between individual prebiotic responses, differences in baseline microbiological and dietary factors, and “supports microbiota personalization strategiesindividual selection therapy”.

The authors comment:We believe for the first time that responses in individuals are correlated across at least some pairs of prebiotics, and that the average response is correlated with host factors.

Host factors

Dietary fiber facilitates the production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) that protect against intestinal diseases, such as colorectal cancer, reduced inflammation and obesity. Butyrate, in particular, is considered a “fuel for intestinal cells”and improves the gut’s resistance to pathogens and inflammation, they explain.

While prebiotic supplements offer “a promising microbiota-targeting approach to promote healthit is difficult to predict treatment responses due to host heterogeneity.

The Duke University team studied the effect of three fermentable fibers (inulin,dextrin​ (Benefiber), and galacto-oligosaccharides​(GOS)) on the production of SCFAs in different individuals to determine the value of personalized diets and found participant responses correlated with “reception factors”,regardless of fiber type.

]]>
Health and well-being: what is dysautonomia? Symptoms and Treatment https://gut-training.com/health-and-well-being-what-is-dysautonomia-symptoms-and-treatment/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 21:52:01 +0000 https://gut-training.com/health-and-well-being-what-is-dysautonomia-symptoms-and-treatment/ BATON ROUGE, La. (BRPROUD) – A fit and healthy 26-year-old woman says she was suddenly struck down by a mysterious illness that left her “unable to stand up or walk, and I had persistent dizziness.” , nausea, severe brain fog, chronic fatigue, migraine and fainting. She spent a month in the hospital. A high school […]]]>

BATON ROUGE, La. (BRPROUD) – A fit and healthy 26-year-old woman says she was suddenly struck down by a mysterious illness that left her “unable to stand up or walk, and I had persistent dizziness.” , nausea, severe brain fog, chronic fatigue, migraine and fainting.

She spent a month in the hospital.

A high school student with big plans for her future says her life changed forever when, “One Saturday during my senior year of high school, I woke up with a stomach bug that never went away. continued for years as other symptoms piled in. During that time I was tested for everything in the book but when test after test showed nothing wrong many people told me “maybe you’re depressed” or “I think you’re doing this to get attention”.

The aforementioned women who shared their stories, Sylvia Arotin and Amanda Ross, respectively, have both been diagnosed with some form of dysautonomia.

What is dysautonomia?

Dysautonomia, also called autonomic dysfunction or autonomic neuropathy, is relatively common and affects more than 70 million people worldwide, according to the Cleveland Clinic.

But what exactly is dysautonomia?

It is actually a label given to a group of medical conditions caused by a malfunction of the autonomic nervous system, which are the nerves that regulate non-voluntary bodily functions such as heart rate, blood pressure, and breathing.

Experts say people with dysautonomia are often misdiagnosed due to the disorder causing such a wide range of symptoms. Thus, many doctors are unsure of the root cause and simply attribute the patient’s symptoms to anxiety.

How does dysautonomia affect people with it?

Symptoms can include:

  • Balance issues
  • Blurred vision
  • Brain “fog”
  • Chest pain
  • Changes in blood pressure
  • Changes in body temperature
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Dizziness or dizziness
  • Dry eyes or excessive tearing
  • Dyserection
  • Fainting
  • Fast or slow heartbeat
  • Frequent urination
  • Irregular heartbeats
  • Light sensitivity
  • Loss of bowel or bladder control
  • Migraines
  • Mood swings
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Noise sensitivity
  • Tiredness or persistent tiredness
  • Shortness of breath
  • Sleep problems
  • Profuse sweating or none at all
  • vertigo
  • Weakness

Sylvia Arotin, quoted at the start of this article, says she experienced symptoms so severe that her whole life was turned upside down for a while.

Arotin explains, “My daily life would consist of moving (if I could) from bed to sofa and back, while dealing with tachycardia, nausea, dizziness, migraine, hot flashes, presyncope and brain fog in various combinations.

Are there effective treatments?

According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, “There is usually no cure for dysautonomia. Secondary forms may improve with treatment of the underlying disease. In many cases, treatment of primary dysautonomia is symptomatic and supportive Measures for orthostatic hypotension include elevation of the head of the bed, water bolus (rapid infusion of water given intravenously), diet high in salt and medications such as fludrocortisone and midodrine.

Amanda Ross, mentioned earlier, hints that there is hope for the sick.

Ross says that after seeing her team of doctors for a few months, they were able to help her manage her condition and she quickly felt “almost normal”.

Arotin also explains that after working with doctors and changing her diet, she was able to find some relief.

Chronic illness and struggle with criticism

However, Arotin added that one of the hardest parts of dealing with a chronic illness comes down to judgment and criticism from those who don’t understand one’s condition.

Arotin said: “The hardest part about this condition, and any form of dysautonomia, is that it’s an ‘invisible disease.’ someone said, “You look good, you don’t look sick.”

To fight against unfair treatment in the workplace, she learned to defend herself and her rights as a disabled person. Having the courage to do it paid off.

She says she now runs a preschool that has “won numerous awards for excellence in education and innovation, appeared in the media and even partnered with government agencies and the Department of Education.”

We were always taught never to judge a book by its cover, and how true that seemed to me now.

Sylvia Arotin, on living with a chronic illness

Find help

If you experience some of the symptoms mentioned in this article and think you have dysautonomia, it may be a good idea to see your doctor.

If you have been diagnosed with some form of dysfunction and would like more information on how to deal with it, helpful suggestions and opportunities for collaboration can be found online at www.dysautonomiainternational.org

]]>
Ex-Chelsea star hits out at Tuchel over treatment of 21-year-old https://gut-training.com/ex-chelsea-star-hits-out-at-tuchel-over-treatment-of-21-year-old/ Mon, 08 Aug 2022 11:43:14 +0000 https://gut-training.com/ex-chelsea-star-hits-out-at-tuchel-over-treatment-of-21-year-old/ Ex-Chelsea player Paul Canoville isn’t the happiest with Thomas Tuchel’s treatment of young winger Callum Hudson-odoi. The retired striker, who was the Blues’ first black senior player, took to social media to denounce his former club for Hudson-odoi’s latest snub. Chelsea recently kicked off their 2022-23 season with an away game against Everton, and although […]]]>

Ex-Chelsea player Paul Canoville isn’t the happiest with Thomas Tuchel’s treatment of young winger Callum Hudson-odoi.

The retired striker, who was the Blues’ first black senior player, took to social media to denounce his former club for Hudson-odoi’s latest snub.

Chelsea recently kicked off their 2022-23 season with an away game against Everton, and although Tuchel’s men emerged victorious with a zero, Hudson-odoi was nowhere to be found. The 21-year-old forward wasn’t even named as a replacement for his coach, and Canoville believes the move was shameful.

MORE: Remarkable De Jong contract details emerge as Barcelona prepare legal action

Writing on his social media about the youngster’s omission from his team’s first game of the season after ‘breaking his guts’ during pre-season to regain his full fitness, Canoville slammed Tuchel and admitted that he was “not happy” with the management of the German’s men.

In line with Canoville’s assessment and after an extended period out of the first team photo, Hudson-odoi has recently been linked with a move to Southampton or Leicester City (Guardian), and fans would certainly forgive him. winger if he were to prioritize his own career at the club he has been loyal to for so many years.

]]>
CAG updates gastroparesis guidelines for diagnosis and treatment in ‘continuing innovation’ https://gut-training.com/cag-updates-gastroparesis-guidelines-for-diagnosis-and-treatment-in-continuing-innovation/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 20:44:24 +0000 https://gut-training.com/cag-updates-gastroparesis-guidelines-for-diagnosis-and-treatment-in-continuing-innovation/ August 05, 2022 2 minute read Source/Disclosures Published by: Disclosures: Camilleri reports NIH funding for all studies related to gastroparesis, as well as research funding from Allergan, Takeda, and Vanda and compensation from Alpha Sigma Wasserman and Takeda. Please see the study for relevant financial information from all other authors. ADD […]]]>

August 05, 2022

2 minute read


Source/Disclosures


Disclosures: Camilleri reports NIH funding for all studies related to gastroparesis, as well as research funding from Allergan, Takeda, and Vanda and compensation from Alpha Sigma Wasserman and Takeda. Please see the study for relevant financial information from all other authors.


We have not been able to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this problem, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

The American College of Gastroenterology released a new guideline for the diagnosis and management of gastroparesis, which was recently published in Jhe American Journal of Gastroenterology.

“The objective of this new guideline is to document, summarize and update the evidence and develop recommendations for the clinical management of gastroparesis (GP)”, Michael Camilleri, MD, DSc, MRCP, MACG, AGAF, professor of gastroenterology and hepatology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and colleagues wrote. “There is a need to recognize the limitations of therapy guideline recommendations in the absence of FDA approved therapies for general practitioners in the United States and the limitation of prescription duration to 3 months for the only drug currently approved, metoclopramide.”



Takeaways from GP guidelines



The updated recommendations build on previous guidelines published in 2013, which focused on assessing and correcting nutritional status, relieving symptoms, improving gastric emptying and, in patients with diabetes, glycemic control.

From February 2019 to July 2021, Camilleri and colleagues conducted extensive literature searches and reviewed 1,908 references, identifying 121 for inclusion and reviewing the evidence. They then developed 20 recommendations for the diagnosis and management of GPs using the guideline ranking, rating, development and evaluation process.

Highlights of the updated guideline include:

  • Gastric emptying scintigraphy is the standard diagnostic test for general practitioners in patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms. The suggested test method includes assessment of stomach emptying for 3 hours or more after a solid meal.
  • Dietary management of patients with GP should include a small-particle diet to increase the likelihood of symptom relief and improved gastric emptying.
  • Considering both the benefits and risks of treatment, pharmacological therapies should be considered to improve symptoms in patients with idiopathic or diabetic gastroparesis.
  • In patients with GP, treatment with metoclopramide rather than no treatment is suggested for the management of refractory symptoms, as is the use of 5-HT4 agonists rather than no treatment to improve gastric emptying. Domperidone, if approved, is suggested for symptom management in patients with GP.
  • Pyloromyotomy is suggested in the absence of treatment for symptom control in patients with symptoms refractory to medical treatment. Intrapyloric injection of botulinum toxin is not recommended based on data from randomized controlled trials.

“This guideline has focused on general practitioner diagnosis and treatment in adults (including dietary, pharmacological, operative, and pyloric-directed interventions),” concluded Camilleri and colleagues. “Nevertheless, this is an area where considerable innovation, validation and research are likely to impact future iterations of these guidelines. Such advances should clarify the role of immunotherapies, new pharmacological agents, pyloric interventions, bioelectric therapy and surgical approaches for general practitioners.

]]>